Environmental guidance for your business in Northern Ireland & Scotland

Fluorinated gases (F-gases)

Fluorinated greenhouse gases (F-gases) are a group of chemicals containing fluorine. F-gases are powerful greenhouse gases that trap heat in the atmosphere and contribute to global warming.

Common uses for F-gases include refrigeration and air-conditioning equipment, aerosols, solvents, foam blowing agents, firefighting fluids and high voltage switchgear.

If you manufacture, supply, use, install or service equipment containing F-gases, or if you manufacture or supply F-gases, you must comply with legislation which aims to limit such releases.

This guideline explains what F-gases, how different types of businesses can comply with the F-gas legislation, and how the legislation is enforced.

Old equipment may contain Ozone Depleting Substances (ODS) These are gases that are now banned in new products across the EU. ODS include chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs). If you have old equipment that you think may contain ODS, read our guidance:

Ozone Depleting Substances

Additional resources

       

Fluorinated greenhouse gases (F-gases) are a family of gases containing fluorine. They are powerful greenhouse gases that trap heat in the atmosphere and contribute to global warming. They are stronger than naturally occurring greenhouse gases and their use is regulated.

There are three main types of F-gases:

  • hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs)
  • perfluorocarbons (PFCs)
  • sulphur hexafluoride (SF6).

Main uses of F-gases F-gases are used in a number of ways:

  • Stationary refrigeration, air conditioning and heat pump (RAC) equipment are some of the largest sources of F-gas emissions.
  • Some stationary fire protection systems and portable fire extinguishers currently use HFCs.
  • Mobile air conditioning in cars and light vans currently uses HFCs. Other air-conditioned and refrigerated transport also uses F-gases.
  • Solvents containing F-gases are used to clean components, eg in the electronics and aerospace industries. 
  • F-gases have many specialist uses such as in the production of magnesium, different types of foam and high voltage switchgear. 

For information about manufacturing, importing and exporting F-gases, see the page in this guide on producing and supplying fluids

Old equipment may contain Ozone Depleting Substances (ODS) These are gases that are now banned in new products across the EU. ODS include chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs). If you have old equipment that you think may contain ODS, read our guidance:

Ozone Depleting Substances

Further information

GOV.UK: EU F-gas regulation: guidance for users, producers and traders

What is the phase down

The phase down of HFCs is designed to steadily reduce the global warming potential (GWP) of all gasses placed on the market in refrigeration, heat pumps and air conditioning in the European Union. The target is to reduce the CO2 equivalent of all gasses in use to 21% of the baseline by 2030. Individual producers and importers will receive a quota based on their 2009-12 baseline.

2009 - 12 2015 2016-17 2018-20 2021-23 2024-26 2027-29 2030
Baseline 100% 100% 93% 63% 45% 31% 24% 21%

 

This is not a ban on any particular type of F-gas, and operators can continue to use the equipment that they have at present. By limiting the total GWP of the F-gases in equipment it is expected that the gases with the highest GWP will be eliminated from the market first.

The higher the GWP of a particular gas, the more expensive it will become. Future costs should be considered when planning for maintenance and servicing of equipment.

Service ban

In 2020, a service ban will come into force which will mean that equipment with a charge in CO2 equivalent greater than 40 tonnes will no longer be able to be refilled or serviced with virgin HFCs with a GWP > 2,500.

This ban doesn’t apply to equipment designed for low temperature refrigeration, at temperatures below -50°C

Recycled or reclaimed gases with a GWP > 2,500 can still be used for servicing and maintenance until 2030, if labelled correctly.

Although possible, the use of HFCs with a high GWP will become increasingly expensive, so in the long term it will make financial sense to opt for equipment containing refrigerants with a low GWP.

40 tonnes of CO  equivalent

Refrigerant Charge size threshold of 40t CO2 equivalent
R23 2.72kg
R404A 10.20kg
R507 10.04kg
R422D 14.66kg

 

Each separate piece of equipment will have its own equipment charge. It used to be the number of kilograms of gas in the system that was important for deciding the actions required for servicing and maintenance of a refrigeration or air conditioning system.

This has changed and it is now a measure of the effect the F-gases in the system could have on the atmosphere that is important. This is calculated by working out the quantity of CO2 that would have to be released to have the same warming effect on the atmosphere as the contents of the system.

This is known as the CO2 equivalent of the F-gas.

The CO2 equivalent of the equipment charge is calculated using:

  • the quantity of F-gases in the equipment in kg
  • the global warming  potential (GWP) of the F-gases in the system.

Different F-gases have different global warming potential. This relates to its ability to absorb energy and add to the warming of the atmosphere. Two pieces of refrigeration equipment that have a similar capacity for refrigerant can contain different F-gases. If released, the impact on the atmosphere could be significantly different

The charge is calculated by multiplying the number of kilograms of F-gas by the global warming potential of the specific gas in the system.

Global warming potential of greenhouse gases, including typical F-gases. The F-gases are shaded.

GAS GWP (100 years)
CO2 1
Methane 25
Nitrous Oxide 298
HFC-134a 1,430
R-404A (HFC blend) 3,922
R-410A (HFC blend) 2,088
HFC-125 3,500
PFC-14 7,390
SF6 22,800

 

Example: Warming potential of 1kg of different gasses

1kg of HFC-134a is equal to 1.43 tonnes of CO2

1kg of R-404A is equal to 3.92 tonnes of CO2

1kg of PFC-14 is equal to 7.39 tonnes of CO2

Example: 5 tonne CO2 equivalent threshold

5 tonnes of CO2 is equal to:

  • 3.5 kg of HFC-134a
  • 1.27 kg of R-404A (HFC blend)
  • 0.68 kg of PFC-14

Stationary refrigeration, air conditioning and heat pump (RAC) systems are one of the largest sources of fluorinated greenhouse gas (F-gas) emissions. F-gases commonly used in RAC systems are:

  • hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) - HFC 23, HFC 134a, HFC 152a
  • perfluorocarbons (PFCs) - PFC 218, R 218, Refrigerant 218.

Responsibility for F-gas obligations

Most of the key F-gas obligations lie with the operator. An operator is a person or business who has actual power over the technical functioning of the equipment. This includes:

  • free access to the system, eg supervising its components or functioning
  • control over the day-to-day running or function
  • powers, including financial, to decide on technical modifications, F-gas quantity modifications or have repairs carried out.

The owner of the equipment is usually the operator unless such functions have been transferred.

What you must do

Key F-gas obligations

If you operate RAC equipment containing F-gases, you must meet legal obligations.

Prevent leakage - where it is technically feasible and does not entail disproportionate cost, you must prevent leakage of F-gas refrigerants, and repair any discovered leaks as soon as possible.

Check leaks regularly - how often you are required to check (using certified personnel) depends on the type of system and the equipment charge CO2 equivalent of F-gas refrigerants used.

Leak testing frequencies

Equipment charge Frequency of leak checks Frequency of checks if leak detection fitted
<5 tonnes CO2 equivalent N/A N/A
5 to <10 tonnes CO2 equivalent If hermetically sealed N/A otherwise 12 months If hermetically sealed N/A Otherwise 24 months
10 - <50 tonnes CO2 equivalent 12 Months 24 Months
50 – 500 tonnes CO2 equivalent 6 months 12 months
> 500 tonnes CO2 equivalent 3 months 6 months

 

From 1 January 2017, equipment that contains less than 3 kg of f-gas (or if hermetically sealed contains less than 6kg of f-gas) will have to be leak tested if the equipment charge in tonnes CO2 equivalent is greater than 5 tonnes. There was previously a derogation from this requirement.

The system must be checked within a month after a leak has been repaired to ensure that the repair has been effective.

Install automatic leak detection systems

You must fit a leak detection system to equipment with a contained charge >  500 tonnes of CO2 equivalent. This system must be checked every 6 months.

Maintain records

You must keep records on all systems containing F-gases including:

  • quantity and type of F-gas in the system
  •  a calculation of the equipment charge in terms of tonnes of its CO2 equivalent quantity of refrigerant recovered through servicing, maintenance and disposal
  • identity of business or personnel servicing or maintaining the system, and the dates and results of leak checks and leak detection system checks.

Recover gas

If F-gas refrigerant is removed from any system, it must be properly recovered by appropriately certified personnel during servicing and decommissioning. You must also ensure that all F-gases that are not recycled or reclaimed are disposed of correctly.

Label equipment

Refrigeration and air conditioning equipment must be correctly labelled. The label must be clearly visible, for example close to a service point. This will include:

  • that the equipment contains f-gases
  • which f-gas is contained
  • the charge size

From 1 January 2017 the label must also indicate:

  • the CO2 equivalent of the charge
  • the Global Warming Potential (GWP) of the f-gas contained

Get certified

Any personnel carrying out leak checking, gas recovery, installation, maintenance or servicing of equipment containing F-gas must be appropriately qualified.

GOV.UK: Qualifications required to work with equipment containing F-gas

The person physically taking delivery of F-gas containers does not need to be qualified unless they also perform installation, servicing or repair work.

Hold company certificates

Businesses that install, maintain or service the equipment must also hold the relevant company certification. The designated certification bodies in the UK are Refcom, Quidos and Bureau Veritas. To get a company certificate you must be able to show that your staff who perform the relevant work hold the correct F-gas qualification, you have the correct tools and procedures available and you have enough staff to cover the work you do.

GOV.UK: Certification for companies working on equipment containing F-gas

Submit reports

If your business produces, reclaims, imports or exports more than 1 tonne of F-gas per year you must complete a report and send it to the European Environment Agency and:

  • In Northern Ireland, the Northern Ireland Environment Agency
  • In Scotland, Defra

Reporting to the European Environment Agency is done online

EC: F-gas reporting

Don't use non-refillable containers

Use of non-refillable containers for transporting and storing F-gases is banned. You must not place non-refillable containers on the market, except for those manufactured (filled with refrigerant) before 4 July 2007.

Alternatives to F-gases

You may wish to consider alternatives to F-gases. However, alternatives may also have restrictions on their use and you should consider the overall environmental impact (eg taking into account energy efficiency) and factors such as health and safety when making your choice. Commonly used alternative refrigerants include:

  • ammonia
  • carbon dioxide
  • hydrocarbons, eg butane and propane.

The phase down of F-gas will mean that progressively less will be available over coming years, starting with the F-gases with the highest GWP.

Further information

GOV.UK: F-gas: Guidance for users, producers and traders

Real Zero: minimising leaks from refrigeration systems

Fluorinated greenhouse gases (F-gases) are used in certain types of fire protection systems - such as specialised buildings serving computers or telecommunications. F-gases used in fire protection systems include hydrofluorocarbons.

The use of perfluorocarbons in firefighting equipment is now banned, except for military and aviation uses.

From 2016 the use of HFC 23 will be banned in new fire protection systems.

Responsibility for F-gas obligations

Most of the key F-gas duties lie with the operator. An operator is a person or business who has actual power over the technical functioning of the equipment. This includes:

free access to the system, eg supervising its components or functioning

control over the day-to-day running or function

powers, including financial, to decide on technical modifications, F-gas quantity modifications or have repairs carried out.

The owner of the equipment is usually the operator unless such functions have been transferred.

What you must do

Key F-gas obligations

If you are an operator of fire protection equipment, you must comply with a number of obligations.

Prevent leakage

Where it is technically possible and does not involve disproportionate cost, you must prevent leakage of F-gas from stationary fire protection systems and repair any discovered leaks as soon as possible.

Check for leaks regularly

How often you are required to check (using certified personnel) depends on the quantity of F-gases in the system and whether a leak detection system has been installed.

Leak testing frequencies

Until 31 December 2016 fire protection equipment with less than 3 kg of refrigerant, or with less than 6kg of refrigerant in a hermetically sealed unit, is exempt from the need to carry out leak checks.

Equipment charge Frequency of leak checks Frequency of checks if leak detection fitted
<5 tonnes CO2 equivalent N/A N/A
5 to <10 tonnes CO2 equivalent If hermetically sealed N/A otherwise 12 months If hermetically sealed N/A Otherwise 24 months
10 - <50 tonnes CO2 equivalent 12 Months 24 Months
50 – 500 tonnes CO2 equivalent 6 months 12 months
> 500 tonnes CO2 equivalent 3 months 6 months

 

The system must be checked within a month after a leak has been repaired to ensure that the repair has been effective.

Install automatic leak detection systems

You must fit a leak detection system to equipment with 300 kilograms or more of F-gases. This system must be checked every 6 months.

Testing in accordance with either the BS EN15004  or ISO 14520 standards will satisfy the F-gas obligations, as all gaseous fire protection systems should be checked every six months to meet the standard's requirements.

British Standards Institution (BSI): BS EN15004

International Organisation for Standardisation: ISO 14520-13

Maintain records

You must keep records on systems which contain F-gases equivalent to 5 tonnes CO2, including:

  • quantity and type of F-gas in the system
  • quantity of F-gas added to the system
  • quantity of F-gas recovered through servicing, maintenance and disposal
  • identity of business or personnel servicing or maintaining the system, and the dates and results of leak checks and leak detection system checks.

Recover gases

If F-gases are removed from any fire protection system or fire extinguisher, they must be properly recovered by appropriately certified personnel.

Hold personnel qualifications

Any personnel carrying out leak checking, gas recovery, installation, maintenance or servicing of equipment containing F-gases must hold an appropriate recognised qualification issued in the UK or the rest of the European Union (EU).

Fire Industry Authority: F-gas fire protection system qualifications

The person physically taking delivery of F-gas containers does not need to be qualified unless they also perform servicing or repair work.

Hold company certificates

Businesses that install, maintain or service the equipment must also hold a company certificate. The designated certification body in Great Britain is the FIA. To get a company certificate you must be able to show your staff hold the correct F-gas qualification, you have the correct tools and procedures available and you have enough staff to cover the work you do.

Labelling

New systems must be correctly labelled, stating the type and quantity of refrigerant used. The label must be located near to the service point.

This will include:

  • that the equipment contains f-gases
  • which f-gas is contained
  • the charge size

From 1 January 2017 the label must also indicate:

  • the CO2 equivalent of the charge
  • the Global Warming Potential (GWP) of the f-gas contained

Submit reports

If you produce, import or export   equipment containing (pre-charged with) F-gases you must make sure that the HFCs are secured through the EU quota system and are purchased from an HFC quota holder. You must label the equipment and keep records of the F-gas you use.

GOV.UK: Importers of products containing F-gases – labels and record keeping

GOV.UK: Manufacturers of products containing F-gases – labels and record keeping

EUROPA: F-gas standard reporting template

Don't use non-refillable containers

Use of non-refillable containers for transporting and storing F-gases is banned. The placing on the market of non-refillable containers is banned, except for those manufactured (filled with F-gas) before 4 July 2007.

GOV.UK: F-gases in refrigeration, air conditioning and fire protection equipment

Further information

Defra: Qualifications required for working with F-gas

GOV.UK: F-gas - Guidance for users, producers and traders

Fire Industry Authority: F-gas fire protection system qualifications

There are legal controls on fluorinated greenhouse gases (F-gases) in mobile air conditioning (MAC) equipment in cars and light vans. These will affect your business if you:

  • manufacture cars or vans
  • supply MAC or refrigerant
  • maintain cars and vans
  • service MAC.

What you must do

Servicing and dismantling obligations

If you service and dismantle MAC systems already installed in vehicles, you must comply with a number of obligations.

Recover gases

Only appropriately qualified personnel must remove F-gases from MAC systems during maintenance and at the end of the vehicle's life to ensure the F-gases are recycled, reclaimed or destroyed. You must also recover residual F-gases from refillable and non-refillable containers to ensure they are recycled, reclaimed or destroyed.

Check and repair leaks

It is good practice to check for leaks in MAC systems regularly. If you find abnormal leakage you must not refill the system until the leak is repaired.

Don't use non-refillable containers

Use of non-refillable containers for transporting and storing F-gases is banned.

Have qualified personnel

Any personnel carrying out F-gas recovery from MAC equipment during servicing or dismantling must have an appropriate qualification.

GOV.UK: Managing f-gases and ODS - Mobile Air Conditioning

Your business must not take delivery of F-gas containers unless your personnel who recover gases are appropriately qualified. The person physically taking delivery of F-gas containers does not need to be qualified unless they also perform servicing, repair or recovery work.

New vehicle obligations

You must not sell new types of cars or light vans fitted with air-conditioning systems containing refrigerants with a global warming potential of more than 150.  From 2017 air conditioning in all new cars and vans must contain refrigerants with a global warming potential less than 150.

The key refrigerant affected is HFC-134a. It is also called Genetron 134a, HFA-134a, HFC-134a, Forane 134a, KLEA 134a, R-134a, Suva 134a and Norflurane.

Solvent users need to comply with certain fluorinated greenhouse gases (F-gas) obligations.

What you must do

F-gas obligations

Perfluorocarbons (PFCs) and certain hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) such as HFC-4310mee and HFC-365mfc are used as solvents and are covered by F-gas obligations. Trade names for these products include Vertrel, Lenium 'F' Series, Solvokane, Electrolube and Flutec.

Some F-gas solvents have a high global warming potential (GWP). GWP measures the strength of a gas in warming the atmosphere. This is a measure of how many times more powerful the gas is in contributing to global warming than CO2. CO2 has a GWP of one.

You should check whether you use solvents containing F-gases that are covered by F-gas regulations and what the GWP of the solvent is.

If you use F-gas solvents covered by F-gas regulations you must comply with a number of obligations.

Recover solvent

Only appropriately qualified personnel must recover F-gas solvent from equipment during plant servicing and maintenance and at their end of life. You must also send recovered solvents for reprocessing or destruction.

Don't knowingly release solvents

You must not knowingly release F-gas solvent vapours to the atmosphere or pour solvents into the drains.

Hold personnel qualifications

Any personnel carrying out solvent recovery activities must hold an appropriate recognised qualification issued in the UK or the rest of the European Union (EU). The designated certification body is Fraser Technologies Ltd.

Your business must not take delivery of F-gas containers unless your personnel who recover solvents are appropriately qualified. The person physically taking delivery does not need to be qualified unless they also perform recovery work.

GOV.UK: F-gases guidance for users, producers and traders

If you manufacture, import, export or supply fluids containing fluorinated greenhouse gases (F-gases) you must comply with a number of obligations.

What you must do

Key F-gas obligations

If you produce, or import into or export out of the European Union, more than 1 tonne or 100 tonnes of CO2 equivalent of F-gas per year, you must report to the European Commission before 31 March each year. You must present the information in a standard template.

HFC Registry: Guidance on how to register

F-Gas registry – Standard reporting template  (sign in required)

In Northern Ireland you must also send a copy to the Northern Ireland Environment Agency.

In Scotland you must send a copy to Defra

All F-gases and products containing F-gases must be traded using the EU quota system.

HFC Registry: How to make a quota transfer

You must label F-gas containers 'placed on the market' showing the type and quantity of fluid. Labels must show the:

  • text 'contains fluorinated greenhouse gases covered by the Kyoto Protocol'
  • abbreviated chemical names of the F-gases contained
  • the charge size

From 1 January 2017 the label must also indicate:

  • the CO2 equivalent of the charge
  • the Global Warming Potential (GWP) of the f-gas contained
  • text 'hermetically sealed' where applicable.

You must make sure that the label is clearly legible, in English and securely fixed to the container.

There are other obligations relating to labels and instruction manuals.

For further information, contact DEFRA at defra.helpline@defra.gsi.gov.uk.

Fluid retained in the container must be properly removed by certified personnel at the end of the container's life.

All personnel, including contractors or subcontractors, who carry out F-gas handling and recovery activities must be properly qualified.

If your business checks for leaks, maintains or services refrigeration, air conditioning, heat pump equipment or fire protection systems containing F-gases, or recovers F-gas from certain types of equipment, you can only take delivery of F-gas if the personnel doing the work are appropriately qualified. The person physically taking delivery doesn't need to be qualified if they don't perform recovery work.

Use of non-refillable containers for transporting or storing F-gas is banned.

If you manufacture or supply chemical substances you must comply with the Classification, Labelling and Packaging of Substances and Mixtures (CLP) Regulation.

REACH Regulation

Further information

GOV.UK: F-gases guidance for users, producers and traders

Some specialist manufacturing activities use fluorinated greenhouse gases (F-gases). Ensure that you comply with any F-gas obligations that apply to your business.

What you must do

Metered dose inhalers (MDIs) and electronics manufacturers

If you manufacture or supply MDIs, or produce electronics components, you must:

  • report annually to the European Commission if you are directly importing more than 1 tonne of F-gas from outside the European Union (EU), and in Scotland send a copy to the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra); in Northern Ireland send a copy to the NIEA
  • recover any F-gas fluid at the end of life of containers used to supply F-gases, but not MDIs themselves
  • employ appropriately qualified staff if you perform recovery work and take delivery of containers of F-gas - the person physically taking delivery doesn't need to be qualified if they don't perform recovery work.

GOV.UK: F-gases Guidance for users, producers and traders

EUROPA: Standard reporting template

Aerosols and One Component Foam (OCF)

OCF manufacturers must no longer use F-gases. OCF importers and distributors must not source OCF manufactured after 4 July 2008 that contain F-gases. Retailers must not sell OCF containing F-gas if it was manufactured after 4 July 2008.

Using F-gas as a propellant in novelty aerosols is also banned. However, it can still be used in technical aerosols.

Magnesium smelters and sand casters

Die casters are banned from using sulphur hexafluoride (SF6), except where they use less than 850 kilograms per year (kg/year). If you are a magnesium smelter or sand caster using less than 850kg/year of SF6, you should still consider using an alternative gas. This will have less impact on global warming and may also save you money.

From I January 2018 the use of sulphur hexafluoride (SF6) is banned for magnesium die-casting, and for the recycling of magnesium die-casting alloys for installations using less than 850kg per year.

If your business performs recovery work and takes delivery of F-gas containers you must employ appropriately qualified personnel to do such work. The person physically taking delivery doesn't need to be qualified if they don't perform recovery work.

If you import or export more than 1 tonne of F-gases, you must report any relevant data about the quantities to the European Commission. You must also send a copy to Defra.

Insulation foam

If you produce or use insulation foam containing F-gases you must:

  • recover blowing agent from waste containers used to supply F gases
  • recover blowing agent at the end of life of containers used to supply F-gases
  • recover F-gas from waste foam, where this is technically possible and does not entail disproportionate cost
  • comply with obligations relating to labelling, training and taking deliveries.

If you directly import more than 1 tonne per year of F-gas, or preparations containing F-gas where the preparation has a global warming potential of 150 or more, for use in foam production from outside the EU, you must report it to the European Commission. You must also send a copy of the report to Defra.

High voltage switchgear

High voltage switchgear is mainly used in the electricity supply industry. If you operate high voltage switchgear that contains SF6 you must:

  • recover SF6 correctly from switchgear and SF6 containers during maintenance and at end of life
  • employ appropriately qualified personnel if you perform recovery work and take delivery of SF6 containers - the person physically taking delivery doesn't need to be qualified if they don't perform recovery work
  • ensure new switchgear is fitted with clear labels that state the type and quantity of SF6, and that the equipment contains an F-gas with a high global warming potential
  • not use non-refillable containers for transporting or storing SF6
  • Check equipment for leaks if it contains more than 6kg of SF6.

It is good practice to keep records for switchgear containing 3 kilograms or more of F-gas.

Further information

GOV.UK: F-gases guidance for users, producers and traders

EUROPA: Standard reporting template

Several organisations enforce the fluorinated greenhouse gas (F-gas) regulations. If you do not comply you can be fined.

In Northern Ireland legislation on F-gases is enforced as follows

Regulating organisation Type of equipment/machinery
Local councils or the Northern Ireland Environment Agency (NIEA) in particular cases Commercial and retail businesses/ Industrial sites not covered by the NIEA, i.e. not part A installations
NIEA Part A installations. Offshore installations used for the generation of energy from water or wind.
Department of Energy and Climate Change Offshore installations other than those used for the generation of energy from water and wind.

The Secretary of State (in practice, usually the GB Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC)) must enforce these Regulations in relation to offshore installations.

In Scotland legislation on F-gases is enforced as follows

Regulating organisation Type of equipment/machinery
Local councils Commercial and retail businesses/Industrial sites not covered by the Scottish Environment Protection Agency (SEPA)
SEPA Industrial facilities with pollution prevention and control permits
The Scottish ministers through Marine Scotland Offshore oil, gas, water and wind installations

 

Regulating organisations can ensure compliance with F-gas legislation by serving information notices and enforcement notices. Breach of a requirement under an enforcement notice would be an offence.

Information notices

These may be issued to people by regulators in order to obtain further information within set deadlines. Failure to comply with the terms of an information notice is considered grounds for the issue of an enforcement notice.

Enforcement notices

Regulators issue enforcement notices if they suspect that businesses are in breach of the regulations. They include a description of the problem, how it can be solved and the date by which it must be fixed.

Advice and guidance

F-gas Support provide targeted advice and guidance to help businesses comply with their legal requirements. This UK wide service is now provided by the Environment Agency.

f-gassupport@environment-agency.gov.uk

Northern Ireland F-gas legislation

Regulation(EU) 517/2014 on fluorinated greenhouse gases and repealing Regulation (EC) 842/2006 Repeals the previous Regulation (EC) 842/2006 and shall apply from the 1st January 2015. Aims to cut the EU’s F-gas emissions by two-thirds by 2030 compared with 2014 levels and to encourage the use of viable and more climate friendly alternatives.. It aims to achieve these objectives by further reducing emissions through extended containment provisions and encouraging the use of low global warming potential (GWP) alternatives through placing on the market bans and the phase down of HFCs.

European Community (EC) Regulation on certain fluorinated greenhouse gases 842/2006. Aims to reduce emissions of fluorinated greenhouse gases through measures for their containment, use, recovery and destruction.

EC Regulation establishing the format for the report to be submitted by producers, importers and exporters of certain fluorinated greenhouse gases 1493/2007.

EC Regulation establishing the form of labels and additional labelling requirements as regards products and equipment containing certain fluorinated greenhouse gases 1494/2007.

EC Regulation establishing standard leakage checking requirements for stationary fire protection systems containing certain fluorinated greenhouse gases 1497/2007.

EC Regulation establishing standard leakage checking requirements for stationary refrigeration, air conditioning and heat pump equipment containing certain fluorinated greenhouse gases 1516/2007.

EC Regulation establishing minimum requirements and the conditions for mutual recognition for the certification of companies and personnel as regards stationary refrigeration, air conditioning and heat pump equipment containing certain fluorinated greenhouse gases 303/2008.

EC Regulation establishing minimum requirements and the conditions for mutual recognition for the certification of companies and personnel as regards stationary fire protection systems and fire extinguishers containing certain fluorinated greenhouse gases 304/2008.

EC Regulation establishing minimum requirements and the conditions for mutual recognition for the certification of personnel recovering certain fluorinated greenhouse gases from high-voltage switchgear 305/2008.

EC Regulation establishing minimum requirements and the conditions for mutual recognition for the certification of personnel recovering certain fluorinated greenhouse gas-based solvents from equipment 306/2008

EC Regulation establishing minimum requirements for training programmes and the conditions for mutual recognition of training attestations for personnel as regards air-conditioning systems in certain motor vehicles containing certain fluorinated greenhouse gases 307/2008.

EC Regulation establishing the format for notification of training and certification programmes 308/2008.

EC Regulation on fluorinated greenhouse gases No 517/2014 Aims to reduce emissions of fluorinated greenhouse gases through measures for their containment, use, recovery and destruction.

EC Regulation (EU) 2015/2067 of 17 November 2015 establishing minimum requirements and the conditions for mutual recognition for the certification of natural persons as regards stationary refrigeration, air conditioning and heat pump equipment, and refrigeration units of refrigerated trucks and trailers, containing fluorinated greenhouse gases and for the certification of companies as regards stationary refrigeration, air conditioning and heat pump equipment, containing fluorinated greenhouse gases

EC Regulation (EU) 2015/2068 of 17 November 2015 establishing the format of labels for products and equipment containing fluorinated greenhouse gases

EC Regulation (EU) 2015/2066 of 17 November 2015 establishing minimum requirements and the conditions for mutual recognition for the certification of natural persons carrying out installation, servicing, maintenance, repair or decommissioning of electrical switchgear containing fluorinated greenhouse gases or recovery of fluorinated greenhouse gases from stationary electrical switchgear

Fluorinated Greenhouse Gases Regulations 2015/310

Apply to England, Scotland and Wales. They apply to Northern Ireland only when dealing with import and export controls and trade with any place outside the UK. They apply to offshore installations, Scottish offshore installations and Northern Ireland offshore installations.

Fluorinated Greenhouse Gases Regulations (Northern Ireland) 2015 SR 425

Implement the requirements of Regulation (EU) No 517/2014 of the European Parliament and revoke the Fluorinated Greenhouse Gases Regulations (NI) 2009, which aims to reduce the emissions of F-gases. The Regulations cover certification of equipment such as refrigeration, fire protection and F-gas based solvents. Creates offences and penalties so that the requirements of the EU F-gas Regulation (which do not deal with import and export controls and trade) are implemented in Northern Ireland. 

Motor Vehicles (Refilling of Air Conditioning Systems by Service Providers) Regulations SI 2009/2194. Makes it an offence (for which you can be fined) for anyone servicing a vehicle air-conditioning system to refill it with fluorinated gases if there has been an abnormal leak of refrigerant and before repairs have been completed.

Road Vehicles (Construction and Use) Regulations SI 1986/1078 Lays down requirements to reduce the environmental impact of constructing, maintaining and using road vehicles, particularly smoke, vapour and gas emissions.

Road Vehicles (Construction and Use) (Amendment) (No. 3) Regulations SI 2009/2196. Amends 1986/1078 by inserting a new regulation which restricts the retrofitting and refilling of vehicle air conditioning systems containing F-gases.

Scotland F-gas legislation

Regulation(EU) 517/2014 on fluorinated greenhouse gases and repealing Regulation (EC) 842/2006 Repeals the previous Regulation (EC) 842/2006 and shall apply from the 1st January 2015. Aims to cut the EU’s F-gas emissions by two-thirds by 2030 compared with 2014 levels and to encourage the use of viable and more climate friendly alternatives.. It aims to achieve these objectives by further reducing emissions through extended containment provisions and encouraging the use of low global warming potential (GWP) alternatives through placing on the market bans and the phase down of HFCs.

European Community (EC) Regulation on certain fluorinated greenhouse gases 842/2006. Aims to reduce emissions of fluorinated greenhouse gases through measures for their containment, use, recovery and destruction.

EC Regulation establishing the format for the report to be submitted by producers, importers and exporters of certain fluorinated greenhouse gases 1493/2007.

EC Regulation establishing the form of labels and additional labelling requirements as regards products and equipment containing certain fluorinated greenhouse gases 1494/2007.

EC Regulation establishing standard leakage checking requirements for stationary fire protection systems containing certain fluorinated greenhouse gases 1497/2007.

EC Regulation establishing standard leakage checking requirements for stationary refrigeration, air conditioning and heat pump equipment containing certain fluorinated greenhouse gases 1516/2007.

EC Regulation establishing minimum requirements and the conditions for mutual recognition for the certification of companies and personnel as regards stationary refrigeration, air conditioning and heat pump equipment containing certain fluorinated greenhouse gases 303/2008.

EC Regulation establishing minimum requirements and the conditions for mutual recognition for the certification of companies and personnel as regards stationary fire protection systems and fire extinguishers containing certain fluorinated greenhouse gases 304/2008.

EC Regulation establishing minimum requirements and the conditions for mutual recognition for the certification of personnel recovering certain fluorinated greenhouse gases from high-voltage switchgear 305/2008.

EC Regulation establishing minimum requirements and the conditions for mutual recognition for the certification of personnel recovering certain fluorinated greenhouse gas-based solvents from equipment 306/2008

EC Regulation establishing minimum requirements for training programmes and the conditions for mutual recognition of training attestations for personnel as regards air-conditioning systems in certain motor vehicles containing certain fluorinated greenhouse gases 307/2008.

EC Regulation establishing the format for notification of training and certification programmes 308/2008.

EC Regulation on fluorinated greenhouse gases No 517/2014 Aims to reduce emissions of fluorinated greenhouse gases through measures for their containment, use, recovery and destruction.

EC Regulation (EU) 2015/2067 of 17 November 2015 establishing minimum requirements and the conditions for mutual recognition for the certification of natural persons as regards stationary refrigeration, air conditioning and heat pump equipment, and refrigeration units of refrigerated trucks and trailers, containing fluorinated greenhouse gases and for the certification of companies as regards stationary refrigeration, air conditioning and heat pump equipment, containing fluorinated greenhouse gases

EC Regulation (EU) 2015/2068 of 17 November 2015 establishing the format of labels for products and equipment containing fluorinated greenhouse gases

EC Regulation (EU) 2015/2066 of 17 November 2015 establishing minimum requirements and the conditions for mutual recognition for the certification of natural persons carrying out installation, servicing, maintenance, repair or decommissioning of electrical switchgear containing fluorinated greenhouse gases or recovery of fluorinated greenhouse gases from stationary electrical switchgear

The Fluorinated Greenhouse Gases Regulations 2015 (SI 310)

These regulations implement the requirements of Regulation (EU) No 517/2014 of the European Parliament and revoke the Fluorinated Greenhouse Gas Regulations 2009. The regulations cover certification of equipment such as refrigeration and fire protection and f-gas based solvents. Creates offences and penalties for not complying with recovery of f-gases legislation, labelling, qualifications and certificates required to work with products or equipment containing them.

Motor Vehicles (Refilling of Air Conditioning Systems by Service Providers) Regulations SI 2009/2194. Makes it an offence (for which you can be fined) for anyone servicing a vehicle air-conditioning system to refill it with fluorinated gases if there has been an abnormal leak of refrigerant and before repairs have been completed.

Road Vehicles (Construction and Use) Regulations SI 1986/1078 Lays down requirements to reduce the environmental impact of constructing, maintaining and using road vehicles, particularly smoke, vapour and gas emissions.

Road Vehicles (Construction and Use) (Amendment) (No. 3) Regulations SI 2009/2196.Amends 1986/1078 by inserting a new regulation which restricts the retrofitting and refilling of vehicle air conditioning systems containing F-gases.

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