Environmental guidance for your business in Northern Ireland & Scotland

Selling electrical and electronic goods

Selling electrical goods

This guidance is relevant if you sell electrical and electronic equipment (EEE). Examples of EEE include:

  • household appliances, eg fridges, kettles, washing machines
  • IT equipment, eg laptops, computer monitors
  • telephones and mobile phones
  • TV sets, radios, video or DVD players
  • electrical tools, eg drills, sanders, saws
  • gardening tools, eg hedge trimmers, lawn mowers
  • toys, eg video game consoles, electronic cars, train sets
  • medical equipment, eg cardiology machines
  • smoke detectors
  • dispensing machines, eg food and drink vending machines.

If you need to dispose of waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) that you produce in your business, see our WEEE guidance.

What you must do

Selling electrical and electronic equipment

If you sell EEE to end users, you must comply with the WEEE Regulations.

You must:

  • check that your suppliers are registered with your environmental regulator
  • provide information for your customers
  • have a take-back system for customers to dispose of their WEEE free of charge.

Rebranding or importing electrical and electronic equipment

If you rebrand or import EEE, you are considered a producer under the WEEE Regulations. This means you have a responsibility for the EEE you place on the market.

You must:

  • join a producer compliance scheme (PCS), who will register you with your environmental regulator as a producer of EEE
  • ensure that the EEE you place on the market is disposed of in an environmentally sound way
  • provide information to your PCS about the EEE you produce.

For more information about your obligations, see our guidance for producers of electrical and electronic equipment.

Further information on selling EEE

Waste electrical and electronic equipment

GOV.UK: WEEE

SEE ALSO: Retail and Wholesale sector guidance

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