Environmental guidance for your business in Northern Ireland & Scotland

Pesticides and biocides

Pesticides and biocides are chemical or biological products used to control pests such as harmful or unwanted animals, plants, fungi, viruses or bacteria. They can cause pollution and harm wildlife if they spill onto land, enter surface water or groundwater or are released into the air. Pesticides and biocides can also be harmful to human health if you do not store and use them properly.

You must make sure that you use only approved pesticides and biocides. If you cause or allow pollution to occur when using, storing or supplying pesticides and biocides, you may be prosecuted and fined. Your business could suffer from losing contracts, production downtime, and you may have to pay clean-up costs and increased insurance premiums.

This guide is particularly relevant if you use pest control products regularly. It explains what pesticides and biocides are, the effects they can have on the environment, and how to use, store and dispose of pesticides and biocides to minimise the risk of pollution.

Pesticides and biocides are chemicals or organisms used to control pests such as harmful or unwanted animals, plants, fungi, viruses or bacteria which cause damage. Pesticides and biocides include:

  • fungicides
  • insecticides
  • herbicides
  • plant growth regulators
  • rodenticides (rat and mouse poisons)
  • animal and bird repellents
  • mole control products
  • wood and masonry preservatives
  • disinfectants
  • human and veterinary medicines
  • anti-fouling products
  • molluscicides (snail and slug pellets)
  • algaecides
  • earth worm control agents.

Pesticides and biocides can cause significant water pollution and land contamination if there is an accident or they are not used in a responsible way. If they enter surface water or groundwater, even in very small amounts, they can have devastating effects. Pesticides and biocides can harm human health if you do not store and use them properly.

Businesses that use pesticides and biocides include those involved in:

  • agriculture - arable, vegetable and fruit growing, pasture, livestock and poultry
  • aquaculture - fish and shellfish farming (veterinary medicine)
  • forestry and woodland
  • horticulture
  • wood and masonry preservation
  • managing invasive species and removing bracken
  • pest control
  • weed control, eg on pavements, industrial complexes and alongside roads and railways
  • marine anti-fouling paints and coatings
  • gardening and landscaping
  • managing parks and golf courses (amenity sector)
  • food storage and preparation
  • healthcare
  • care of domestic pets.

Further information

Health and Safety Executive (HSE): Biocides information

HSE Chemicals Regulation Directorate: Pesticides information

If you supply pesticides or biocides you must check that the pesticides or biocides you sell have been approved in the UK and that your products are labelled correctly. You may need to provide a safety data sheet (SDS) for your customers.

Apply to place pesticides and biocides on the market

Before you place a new pesticide or biocide product on the market, you must check whether it needs to be approved for advertisement, sale, supply, storage and use. If it does, you must gain approval for that product before you market it. You must apply to the relevant registration authority and supply them with all the data and information they need to evaluate your product. See the page in this guideline: Getting approval for pesticides and biocides

Once an approved product is on sale you should monitor it. If you find out about adverse effects of the pesticide or biocide on human health or the environment, you must tell the registration authority as soon as possible. You should also tell them about any unwanted effects on what is being treated.

If you place a biocidal product on the market for the first time, you must provide certain information to the National Poisons Information Service (NPIS).

NPIS: What the Biocidal Products Regulations mean

Provide information for customers

If you market or sell pesticides or biocides you must ensure that all packaging, labelling and advertising meets the requirements in the product's authorisation. In some cases, it must also meet the requirements of the Chemical Labelling and Packaging (CLP) Regulations.

HSE: CLP Regulations

If you supply pesticides or biocides you may need to use a hazard warning label or provide an SDS. This is now a requirement of the Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals Regulation.

Chemical storage

If you sell, supply or store to sell plant protection products, you should follow the 'Code of Practice for Suppliers of Pesticides to Agriculture, Horticulture and Forestry' (the Yellow Code). This statutory code of practice covers storage, training requirements, transport, waste disposal and how to deal with spills.

HSE Chemicals regulation Directorate: The Yellow Code (PDF, 915K)

Ensure sales staff and storekeepers are qualified

If you sell or supply plant protection products, you need to have a certificate of competence for sales or sales storekeeping. BASIS is an organisation set up to establish and assess standards in the pesticides industry.

RBASIS(Registration) Ltd: Information about certificates of competence

The Yellow Code will also tell you who needs a certificate of competence for the job they do.

Ensure your staff keep their training up-to-date.

Check that the purchaser has an appropriate certificate of competence for pesticides

In Scotland it is a requirement for anyone selling plant protection products to make sure that the person who will be using the product has the appropriate certificate.

Before you use any pesticide or biocide, you must make sure that it has been approved by the correct regulating body:

  • the Chemicals Regulation Directorate (CRD) - part of the Health & Safety Executive (HSE) - regulates plant protection products and biocidal products
  • the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency regulates medicines and products used on humans, such as anti-headlice treatments and certain skin disinfectants
  • the Veterinary Medicines Directorate (VMD) regulates veterinary medicinal products, including sheep dips and other products used to treat animals.

You must not use any banned pesticides or biocides.

You must only use the product as instructed on the label. If you want to use the product in a different way, contact the relevant approval authority for advice.

Check if your pesticides are persistent organic pollutants (POPs)

Some pesticides are classed as POPs - chemicals that do not break down easily or quickly in the environment. The use of POPs is being phased out, and some are already banned in the UK. The following pesticides are classed as POPs:

  • aldrin
  • chlordane
  • chlordecone
  • dieldrin
  • endrin
  • heptachlor
  • hexachlorobenzene (HCB)
  • hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) - including lindane
  • mirex
  • toxaphene
  • dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT)

There are some situations when you may be allowed to use POPs. If you are allowed and you have more than 50 kilograms of POPs or POP-containing substances, you must tell your environmental regulator. If you have any of these pesticides, or if you need to find out about how to use or dispose of POPs, you should contact your environmental regulator.

Contact your environmental regulator

Training and certificates for using plant protection products

If you use pesticides or biocides as part of your job you must have the correct training, instruction and guidance.

In Northern Ireland you should read chapter 6 of the Code of Good agricultural practice

Department of Agriculture and Rural Development: Code of good agricultural practice

In Scotland you should read chapter 9 of the Prevention of Environmental Pollution from Agricultural Activities (PEPFAA) Code of good practice

Scottish Government: The PEPFAA Code

If you employ someone else to apply plant protection products for you, make sure they have the appropriate qualifications to do the job. If you use someone who isn't qualified, you may have to pay to clean up any pollution incidents they cause.

In Scotland you must make sure that your pesticide application equipment is tested when five years old. Rucksacks and handheld sprayers are exempt from this regulation but must be kept in good condition. From 26 November 2015 Grandfather Rights expire (they may have applied if you spray on your own or your employers land) and pesticide spraying must always be carried out by someone with the appropriate certificate.

Scottish Government: Changes to pesticide rules

Be qualified to fumigate

Fumigation is a potentially hazardous process which uses toxic gases to kill pests.

You must hold, or be supervised by someone who holds, a certificate of proficiency for fumigation operators from the British Pest Control Association (BPCA) if you use fumigants such as:

  • phosphine
  • chloropicrin
  • sulfuryl fluoride.

You can now only use methyl bromide in emergencies. You must first gain approval from the Chemicals Regulation Directorate (CRD).

CRD: Contact details

If you use methyl bromide you or your supervisor must also have completed the specific modules that relate to the work.

British Pest Control Association: Training courses

If you employ someone else to carry out fumigation, check that they are qualified.

HSE: Fumigation operations guidance

Further information

Chemicals Regulation Directorate: Approved and withdrawn Plant Protection Products

HSE: Approved biocides and non-agricultural pesticides register

HSE: Withdrawn biocides and non-agricultural pesticides register

Veterinary Medicines Directorate: Authorised veterinary medicinal products

You must not use pesticides and biocides in or near water unless they are specifically approved for that use.

Chemicals Regulation Directorate: Approved and withdrawn Plant Protection Products

Requirements for spraying near watercourses

You must have approval from your environmental regulator before using herbicides on aquatic weeds or weeds on the banks of watercourses such as rivers, ditches or lochs/loughs.

For certain pesticides that you apply using ground crop sprayers or broadcast air-assisted sprayers you need to maintain an aquatic buffer strip between the area you spray and watercourses. The product label will specify the width of the buffer strip that you will have to maintain.

Under certain circumstances, and depending on the pesticide used, you may be able to reduce this aquatic buffer.

If you want to reduce the width of this strip you will also need to carry out and record a Local Environmental Risk Assessment for Pesticides (LERAP).

CRD: Local Environmental Risk Assessment for Pesticides

Aerial spraying

Notify the relevant authorities before aerial spraying

If you carry out aerial spraying you must make sure that:

  • the spraying is done in line with an approved Application Plan
  • specific spraying operations have been permitted by the Health and Safety Executive's (HSE) Chemical Regulation Directorate (CRD).

CRD: Aerial spraying permitting arramgements

Deal with pesticide or biocide spills

You must contain any spills and call the as soon as possible. If a spill enters the sewer, you must tell your water and sewerage company immediately.

Further information

Voluntary Initiative: Using pesticides near water

Forestry Commission: Pesticide publications and technical guidance

What you must do

Have a certificate of competence

You may need a qualification called a certificate of competence if you use agricultural pesticides.

In Northern Ireland you should read chapter 6 of the Code of Good agricultural practice.

Northern Ireland: Code of Agricultural Practice for the Prevention of pollution of Water, Air and Soil

In Scotland, read section 2 of the code for using plant protection products to find out if you need a certificate of competence.

Scottish Government: Code of Practice for Using Plant Protection Products

From 26 November 2015 Grandfather Rights expire (they may have applied if you spray on your own or your employers land) and pesticide spraying must always be carried out by someone with the appropriate certificate.

Maintain your spraying equipment

In Scotland you must make sure that your pesticide application equipment is tested at least once by 26 November 2016 unless it is less than five years old on that date. Knapsacks and handheld sprayers are exempt from this regulation but must be kept in good condition.

Scottish Government: Changes to pesticide rules

In Scotland you can find details of your nearest sprayer test centre on the National Sprayer Testing Scheme website

In Northern Ireland you should follow the guidance in section six of the Code of Practice.

Northern Ireland: Code of Agricultural Practice for the Prevention of pollution of Water, Air and Soil

In Scotland you must comply with the requirements of GBR 23

You must apply pesticides in accordance with the terms and instructions of the product approval, follow the instructions carefully. You must also spray pesticides in a way that the risk of pollution is minimised.

Prepare the pesticides for spraying, and clean and maintain equipment at least 10 m away from any burn, ditch, river, wetland, loch, estuary or coastal water. If you use water from any of these sources to dilute the pesticide you must use an intermediate container, or fit a device that prevents back siphoning.

You must avoid spraying:

  • When it is raining, or when the wind could cause the spray to drift outwith the target area
  • Onto frozen, snow covered or waterlogged soil
  • Within 1 metre of any river, burn, ditch, wetland, loch, estuary or coastal water
  • Onto ground that is sloping, unless there is a way of intercepting the runoff
  • Within 50 metres of any spring that supplies drinking water, or any uncapped well or borehole
  • Onto impermeable surfaces that drain to the surface water drainage,
  • Onto roads, railways, permeable surfaces or other structures

Aerial spraying

Notify the relevant authorities before aerial spraying

If you carry out aerial spraying you must make sure that:

  • the spraying is done in line with an approved Application Plan
  • specific spraying operations have been permitted by the Health and Safety Executive's (HSE) Chemical Regulation Directorate (CRD).

CRD: Aerial spraying permitting arramgements

Requirements for spraying near watercourses

You must have approval from your environmental regulator before using herbicides on aquatic weeds or weeds on the banks of watercourses such as rivers, ditches or lochs/loughs.

For certain pesticides that you apply using ground crop sprayers or broadcast air-assisted sprayers you need to maintain an aquatic buffer strip between the area you spray and watercourses. The product label will specify the width of the buffer strip that you will have to maintain.

Under certain circumstances, and depending on the pesticide used, you may be able to reduce this aquatic buffer.

If you want to reduce the width of this strip you will also need to carry out and record a Local EnvironmentalRisk Assessment for Pesticides (LERAP).

CRD: Local Environmental Risk Assessment for Pesticides

Good practice

Check the codes of good agricultural practice

Northern Ireland: Code of Agricultural Practice for the Prevention of pollution of Water, Air and Soil

Scottish Government: Code of Practice for Using Plant Protection Products in Scotland

SRUC: Using pesticides information leaflet

Store all chemicals in an area where you can contain spills. Keep chemical containers within an impermeable secondary containment area that will hold liquids if the main containers leak or break.

Secondary containment areas include bunds, bunded or spill pallets, sump pallets, bunded storage units and storage cabinets with integral sumps.

If you have one storage container in a bund, the bund should be able to hold at least 110 per cent of its volume.

If you have more than one container, your bund should be able to contain at least 110 per cent of the volume of the largest container or 25 per cent of the total volume you are likely to store, whichever is greater.

Health and Safety Executive – Storing agricultural pesticides

Manage your pesticide use

Only buy the amount of pesticides and biocides that you need.

Keep an inventory of the pesticides and biocides you have on site, and details of when you received them and when you should dispose of them if you don't use them up. This will help you to avoid having more than you need, and therefore reduce your waste.

Check the pesticides register of approved products to see if products you use are going to be withdrawn. The register gives details of product approval, revocation and withdrawal.

Chemicals Regulation Directorate: Approved and withdrawn Plant Protection Products

HSE: Approved biocides and non-agricultural pesticides register

Alternatives to pesticides and biocides

Think carefully whether you really need to use a pesticide at all. If you use a pesticide when you don't need to you:

  • will be wasting money
  • will increase the possibility of pests becoming resistant
  • could damage the treated area.

You can use techniques that reduce the use of pesticides and biocides, including biological and cultural control methods, and using disease-resistant varieties of plants. Cultural control methods include crop rotation and techniques to maintain crops in peak health so they are less susceptible to pests. This is known as integrated pest management.

The Voluntary Initiative: Pesticide use advice

Pesticides and biocides must be approved before you can import, use, sell, store, supply or advertise them. Pesticides and biocides are approved depending on the product's use.

Biocidal products are approved by the Health & Safety Executive (HSE) Chemicals Regulation Directorate (CRD). This covers products including:

  • disinfectants
  • insecticides
  • fungicides
  • preservatives
  • other products used for food storage and public hygiene.

HSE: Biocides and pesticides

Plant protection products (PPP) are also approved and regulated by the CRD. This covers products including:

  • insecticides
  • fungicides
  • molluscicides (snail and slug pellets)
  • rodent control
  • other products used for agriculture, horticulture, gardening and landscaping, and other amenity and industrial uses.

The registration of PPPs is harmonised throughout the European Union (EU).

EUROPA: Placing plant protection products on the market

The PPP authorisation process in the EU is changing. The Plant Protection Product Regulations 2011 introduce a new zonal system for authorising PPPs. They also introduce hazard based criteria, assessment of cumulative and synergistic effects, comparative assessment and endocrine disruption on plants.

CRD: Regulation of plant protection products in Europe

Human medicinal products are approved and regulated by the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). This covers products used on humans such as anti-headlice treatments and some skin disinfectants.

MHRA: The approval of human medicinal products

Veterinary medicines are approved and regulated by the Veterinary Medicines Directorate (VMD). This covers products used on animals such as sheep dip, worming and flea treatments.

VMD: regulation of veterinary medicines

Further information

CRD: PPP applicant guide explaining zonal authorisations

You are legally responsible for ensuring that all waste your business produces or handles is stored, transported and disposed of safely - this is your duty of care.

Pesticides and biocides are likely to be classed as hazardous/special waste. You will have to separate this from other waste.

You must ensure that anyone you pass your waste on to is authorised to take and transport it, and that they take it to an authorised disposal site. You can find who is allowed to deal with your waste in our guideline:

Duty of care - your waste responsibilities

Keep copies of waste paperwork

As the waste producer, you must ensure that all waste leaving your site is covered by a waste transfer note, or a consignment note if it is hazardous/special waste.

You must keep copies of waste transfer notes for two years and consignment notes for three years.

Hazardous/special waste

Deal with dilute pesticides, biocides and wash water

You should treat water used for washing down equipment or rinsing empty containers as dilute pesticides or biocides. There are different disposal options for dealing with dilute pesticides, biocides and wash water:

  • Use a licensed waste contractor
  • Dispose to land. You must get a groundwater authorisation from the NIEA.
  • Dispose to biobed.You must register an exemption from waste management licensing with the NIEA.
  • Dispose to sewer. You must get a trade effluent consent from your water and sewerage company.

NIEA: Licensed waste sites on the public registers

SEPA: Who is registered?

Water UK: Find your water and sewerage provider

Scotland on Tap: Water and sewerage provides

You may need to register an exemption from waste management licensing to dispose of wash water from pesticide and biocide containers.

Environmental permits and licences – an overview

Deal with concentrates and ready-to-use formulations

You must transport and dispose of concentrates and ready-to-use formulations as hazardous waste. You must use a waste contractor.

You should never dilute concentrates or ready-to-use formulations to dispose of them as dilute pesticides or biocides.

Rinse packaging and containers correctly

Check product labels to see if your waste containers and packaging should be rinsed. You must never rinse or clean containers of hydrogen cyanide gassing powders or aluminium, magnesium or zinc phosphates as they react with moisture to produce a poisonous gas.

If your containers and packaging can be rinsed, you must follow the product label instructions and rinse the container, the lid and foil seal. Place the rinsed foil seal inside the container. You can dispose of containers that have been triple rinsed and drained as normal waste.

If your containers cannot be rinsed, you must handle them as if they contain pesticides or biocides. You must dispose of them as hazardous/special waste.

Reduce waste pesticides and biocides

Reduce your waste pesticides and biocides by following the codes of good practice.

DAERA: Code of good agricultural practice

Scottish Government: The PEPFAA Code

You should know how to deal with incidents involving pesticides or biocides. Incidents include:

  • spills of pesticides or biocides to the environment
  • adverse reactions or illness caused by exposure to pesticides or biocides, eg respiratory problems
  • pets or wild animals being poisoned due to irresponsible or illegal use of pesticides or biocides.

Prepare for pollution incidents

If you use pesticides and biocides as part of your job you must be trained in emergency procedures. Your emergency action plans should be kept up to date to cover new equipment or new ways of working. Many product labels will have specific advice on what to do if there is an incident. This information is always on the manufacturer's safety data sheet, which you should be able to get when you buy the product.

Make sure that your staff are familiar with emergency procedures and know how to implement them. If you store lots of pesticides or biocides, for example if you have a warehouse, you may need to install a spill alarm so that you can evacuate the building if there is an incident.

Keep a spill kit nearby

You should ensure that you have a spill kit close to where you might need it. Your spill kit should contain absorbent materials such as sand or cat litter, and other containment equipment suitable for the type and quantity of pesticides and biocides you store and use on your site.

Try to prevent liquid spills from entering drains or watercourses. For example, use earth to block the flow of large spills, or use sand or a commercial spill kit to soak them up.

You should never hose down a spill, as you could cause a much worse pollution incident. If you store pesticides or biocides in a vehicle, you should also carry a suitable spill kit.

Use bunds and drip trays

You should store all pesticides and biocides in an area where you can contain spills. This should be on or within a secondary containment system such as:

  • an impermeable bunded area
  • a bunded pallet or spill pallet
  • a sump pallet
  • a bunded storage unit
  • a drip tray.

Chemical storage

Prevent environmental damage

Water pollution can be classed as environmental damage in some circumstances. You must prevent and remedy environmental damage that occurs from water pollution or land contamination caused by your business activities. If anyone else reports environmental damage as a result of your activities, an enforcing authority will have to investigate.

Environmental damage

Preventing water pollution

Report pollution incidents

You should report any pollution incidents as soon as they happen to the UK wide Pollution Hotline on Tel 0800 80 70 60.

If you suspect that your health has been adversely affected by pesticides or biocides, you should report it to:

  • the Health and Safety Executive for Northern Ireland (HSENI)
  • Healthy Working Lives in Scotland

Health and Safety Executive Northern Ireland (HSENI): Report an incident

HSENI: Notification of pesticides incidents (PDF, 161K)

Healthy Working Lives (Scotland): Recording and reporting an incident

If you suspect wildlife has been harmed by an incident involving pesticides or biocides, you should call the Wildlife Incident Investigation Scheme (WIIS) Helpline on Tel 0800 321 600.

Wildlife Incidents Investigation Scheme

The Voluntary Initiative provides guidance to agriculture and horticulture businesses on best practice for using plant protection products. It also provides training and advice, and links to container recycling schemes and other initiatives to help you protect the environment and save money.

Voluntary Initiative: Using pesticides responsibly

The Pesticide Action Network UK (PAN) is a non-governmental organisation that campaigns to reduce pesticide use and eliminate hazardous pesticides. They publish a list of pesticides that have potential harmful health or environmental impacts.

Pesticides Action Network UK

The Pesticide Forum oversees the work under the UK pesticides strategy and provides a forum for exchanging views.

The Pesticides Forum

The Chemicals Regulation Directorate (CRD) is part of the Health & Safety Executive (HSE) and ensures pesticides and biocides are used safely. They approve pesticides and biocides for use and produce guidance for biocide and pesticide manufacturers and users.

Health and Safety Executive (HSE): Biocides information

HSE Chemicals Regulation Directorate: Pesticides information

The Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB) is a non-governmental organisation that works for the conservation of wild birds and gives advice on management of the environment.

RSPB: Pesticides

The Forestry Commission provides a number of technical publications dealing with the safe use of pesticides.

Forestry Commission: Pesticide publications and technical guidance

This page provides links to the full text of key pieces of environmental legislation relating to pesticides and biocides. The websites hosting the legislation may list amendments separately.

If you are setting up an environmental management system (EMS) for your business, you can use this list to start compiling your legal register. Your legal adviser or environmental consultant will be able to tell you if other environmental legislation applies to your specific business.

Environmental management systems (EMS) and environmental reports

Northern Ireland Pesticides and Biocides legislation

European Community (EC) Regulation 1107/2009 concerning the placing of plant protection products on the market. Controls the approval and placing on the market of plant protection products.

Food and Environment Protection Act 1985. Provides the legal framework for controlling pesticides.

Medicines Act 1968. Sets out the licences and certificates required for medicinal products.

Pesticides Act 1998. Amends the Food and Environment Protection Act 1985 regarding powers to make pesticides regulations and enforcement of pesticide control measures.

EU Regulation No 528/2012 concerning the making available on the market and use of biocidal products

A direct acting EU regulation. It lays down rules for the authorisation of biocidal products relating to the making available on the market, use and control of such products within the EU.

EU Regulation No1272/2008 on classification, labelling and packaging of substances and mixtures

A direct acting EU regulation which came into force in 2009. It adopts an international chemicals hazard classification and labelling system for the supply of substances and mixtures in the EU. It replaces the existing European System and after a transitional period takes full effect from 1 June 2015.

Biocidal Products and Chemicals (Appointment of Authorities and Enforcement ) Regulations (Northern Ireland) 2013 SR 206

Appoints competent authorities and provides for enforcement, including penalties for infringement, in respect of two direct-acting EU Regulations, namely Regulation (EU) No 528/2012 concerning the making available on the market and use of biocidal products and Regulation (EC) No 1272/2008 on classification, labelling and packaging of substances and mixtures.

Biocidal Products (Fees and Charges) Regulations (Northern Ireland) 2013 SR 207

Make provision for fees payable by duty-holders under the Biocides Regulations.

Biocidal Products Regulations (Northern Ireland) SR 2001/422.

Biocidal Products (Amendment) Regulations (Northern Ireland) SR 2007/190.

Biocidal Products (Amendment) Regulations (Northern Ireland) SR 2010/163.

Applications for biocidal product authorisations submitted before 1st September 2013 shall be evaluated in accordance with these regulations. Following evaluation, if a decision is proposed to authorise or refuse to authorise a biocidal product that decision will be taken in accordance with the Biocides Regulation EU 528/2012

Control of Pesticides Regulations (Northern Ireland) SR 1987/414. Defines which pesticides are controlled (amended by later legislation) and require full approval and consent from the Department of Agriculture and Rural Development before they may be advertised, sold, supplied, stored or used. Not available online.

Control of Pesticides (Amendment) Regulations (Northern Ireland) SR 1991/203. Not available online.

Control of Pesticides (Amendment) Regulations (Northern Ireland) SR 1997/469. Amends 1987/414 to clarify the scope, exclusions from the approval process and extend access to information about approvals.

Plant Health (Amendment No.3) Order (Northern Ireland) 2012 SR 392 Amends 2006/82 to introduce emergency measures to prevent the introduction and spread of a fungus called Chalara fraxinea T. Kowalski, including its teleomorph Hymenoscyohus pseudoalbidus, a cause of ash dieback.

Plant Health Order (Northern Ireland) SR 2006/82. Implements protective measures for introducing and preventing the spread of organisms harmful to plants or plant products.

Plant Health (Amendment) Order (Northern Ireland) SR 2006/165. Amends 2006/82 to clarify that when plants in transit between two countries pass through a third country where they could have been infected or contaminated by pests, a new phytosanitary certificate must be issued by the transit country. The certificate must be issued in the transit country.

Plant Protection Products Regulations (Northern Ireland) SR 1995/371. Controls the sale and supply of plant protection products, mainly agricultural pesticides. Makes it an offence to use or distribute a non-approved pesticide. Not available online.

Plant Protection Products (Basic Conditions) Regulations (Northern Ireland) SR 1997/470. Specifies controls on marketing, advertising, storing and using plant protection products in Northern Ireland.

Plant Protection Products Regulations (Northern Ireland) SR 2005/526. Sets out the approval system for placing plant protection products on the market in Northern Ireland, including enforcement, offences and penalties.

Plant Protection Products (Amendment) Regulations (Northern Ireland) SR 2007/251. Amends the Biocidal Products Regulations (Northern Ireland) 2001 to make further measures to implement Directive 98/8/EC on placing biocidal products on the market.

Plant Protection Products (Amendment No 2) Regulations (Northern Ireland) SR 2008/499. Amends 2005/526 to refer to the EU Plant Protection Directive.

Plant Protection Products Regulations (Northern Ireland) SR 2011/295. Implements various aspects of EC Regulation 1107/2009. They also lay down enforcement powers and penalties for infringements regarding the placing on the market of plant protection products.

The Plant Protection Products (Sustainable Use) Regulations 2012 These regulations establish a framework tom,promote good practice in the storage, use and disposal of Plant Protection Products (PPPs) and their packaging. Measures include the establishment of NAPs, compulsory testing of equipment, provision of training for operators, advisors and distributors of PPPs, and a ban on aerial spraying.

Scotland Pesticides and Biocides legislation

European Community (EC) Regulation 1107/2009 concerning the placing of plant protection products on the market. Controls the approval and placing on the market of plant protection products.

Food and Environment Protection Act 1985. Provides the legal framework for controlling pesticides.

Medicines Act 1968. Sets out the licences and certificates required for medicinal products.

Pesticides Act 1998. Amends the Food and Environment Protection Act 1985 regarding powers to make pesticides regulations and enforcement of pesticide control measures.

EU Regulation No 528/2012 concerning the making available on the market and use of biocidal products

A direct acting EU regulation. It lays down rules for the authorisation of biocidal products relating to the making available on the market, use and control of such products within the EU.

EU Regulation No1272/2008 on classification, labelling and packaging of substances and mixtures

A direct acting EU regulation which came into force in 2009. It adopts an international chemicals hazard classification and labelling system for the supply of substances and mixtures in the EU. It replaces the existing European System and after a transitional period takes full effect from 1 June 2015.

The Biocidal Products (Fees and Charges) Regulations 2013 SI 1507

Make provision for fees payable by duty-holders under the Biocides Regulations

The Biocidal Products and Chemicals (Appointment of Authorities and Enforcement) Regulations 2013 SI 1506

Appoints competent authorities and provides for enforcement, including penalties for infringement, in respect of two direct-acting EU Regulations, namely Regulation (EU) No 528/2012 concerning the making available on the market and use of biocidal products and Regulation (EC) No 1272/2008 on classification, labelling and packaging of substances and mixtures.

Biocidal Products Regulations SI 2001/880. Bans placing biocidal products (or a new substance for use in a product) on the market without authorisation.

Biocidal Products (Amendment) Regulations SI 2007/293. Amends 2001/880, including the definitions of 'existing active substance' and 'new active substance'.

Biocidal Products (Amendment) Regulations SI 2010/745. Amends 2001/880 to extend to 14 May 2014 the end date for transitional provisions allowing existing products to remain on the market and subject to UK legislation while their active substances are reviewed for safety.

Control of Pesticides Regulations SI 1986/1510. Sets out restrictions on selling, supplying or storing pesticides and precautions to protect the health of humans, the environment, and particularly water, when using pesticides. Not available online.

Control of Pesticides (Amendment) Regulations SI 1997/188. Amends 1986/1510, explaining what the regulations cover, how regulators can seize and dispose of pesticides and inform the public.

Plant Protection Products (Basic Conditions) Regulations SI 1997/189. Specifies controls on marketing, advertising, storing and using plant protection products.

Plant Protection Products (Scotland) Amendment Regulations SSI 2006/241. Amends 2005/331 to add 21 more active substances that can be used in plant protection products in Scotland.

Plant Protection Products (Scotland) Amendment (No 2) Regulations SSI 2006/449. Amends 2005/331 by substituting a new schedule of active substances.

Plant Protection Products (Scotland) Amendment Regulations SSI 2007/119. Amends 2005/331 to add 14 more active substances that can be used in plant protection products in Scotland.

The Plant Protection Products (Sustainable Use) Regulations 2012 These regulations establish a framework tom,promote good practice in the storage, use and disposal of Plant Protection Products (PPPs) and their packaging. Measures include the establishment of NAPs, compulsory testing of equipment, provision of training for operators, advisors and distributors of PPPs, and a ban on aerial spraying.

Whats new on NetRegs

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