Environmental guidance for your business in Northern Ireland & Scotland

More general materials and equipment topics

More general materials and equipment guidance in alphabetical order

Additional resources

       

This guidance covers any adhesives you use to glue components together when you assemble machinery or equipment.

If you use adhesives you must control your odour and solvent emissions.

Solvent emissions

Noise, odour and other nuisances

What you must do

Comply with your permit, licence or exemption

If you have a permit, licence or exemption you must comply with its conditions. If you do not comply with conditions you can be fined or even sent to prison.

Comply with your waste responsibilities

You must comply with your duty of care responsibilities when you use or handle waste adhesives and adhesive containers.

If you use adhesives that contain organic solvents or 'two-pack' fixatives you must comply with any relevant hazardous/special waste controls.

Good practice

Keep adhesives that contain volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in sealed containers to reduce your site's odour emissions.

Store your adhesives in a locked, bunded area away from direct sunlight. A bund is a structure designed to prevent substances from escaping into the environment if the storage tank or barrels containing adhesives or other substances leak or burst.

If you spill adhesives, use absorbent or adsorbent granules to clean up the spill. Do not wash down your site where adhesives containing VOCs have been spilt.

Ask your suppliers if they can supply you with adhesives that do not contain VOCs.

Only pour out the amount of adhesive you require for each assembly shift to avoid waste.

This guidance is relevant if you manufacture, import, sell or distribute batteries or electronic and electrical equipment (EEE) that contains batteries.

What you must do if you manufacture or import batteries

If you manufacture or import batteries or EEE containing batteries and place them on the UK market for the first time, you must:

  • ensure they contain only permitted levels of cadmium and mercury
  • label them correctly
  • keep records of the number and weight of batteries you place on the market
  • check if you need to join a producer compliance scheme
  • register with your environmental regulator.

If you design EEE or machinery that uses batteries you must:

  • make sure the batteries can be easily removed from the appliance
  • provide instructions showing how the battery can be removed safely from the appliance and name the battery type where appropriate.

Comply with restrictions on mercury and cadmium

You must not place a battery on the market if it contains more than 0.0005% mercury by weight. There is an exception for button cells, which must have less than 2% mercury by weight. This exception is in place until 1 October 2015

You must not place a portable battery on the market if it contains more than 0.002% cadmium by weight. There are exceptions to this rule for:

  • emergency equipment including alarms and lighting
  • medical equipment
  • cordless power tools. The exception for power tools ends on 1 January 2017.

Read our guidance on battery materials and labelling.

Label batteries correctly

If you manufacture or market batteries or battery packs you must label the battery with the crossed-out wheeled bin symbol.

The crossed-out wheeled bin symbol must be printed visibly, be easy to read and permanent. It must take up 3% of the area of the battery or 1.5% of the area of cylindrical batteries.

The symbol size should not be greater than 50x50mm. If the symbol will be smaller than 5x5mm because of the size of the product then it should be printed on the battery packaging and measure at least 10x10mm.

If you place a battery on the market containing mercury, cadmium or lead you must ensure that you label it correctly.

Hazardous substances in batteries

What you must do

Mercury

If you place a button battery on the market that contains more than 0.0005% mercury it must be marked clearly with the chemical symbol Hg below the crossed out wheelie bin.

Cadmium

If you place a battery on the market that contains more than 0.002% cadmium it must be marked clearly with the chemical symbol Cd below the crossed out wheelie bin.

Lead

If you place a battery on the market that contains more than 0.004% lead it must be marked clearly with the chemical symbol Pb below the crossed out wheelie bin.

Read our guidance on battery materials and labelling.

Keep records

You must keep records of the types and total weight of batteries you produce and place on the market per year.

Join a battery compliance scheme if you produce or market portable batteries

If you produce or market more than one tonne of portable batteries or products containing batteries or accumulators per year you must join a battery compliance scheme.

Portable batteries are small sealed batteries commonly found in household appliances, such as AAA cells, mobile phone batteries and button cells found in watches.

The battery compliance scheme will collect, treat and recycle your batteries on your behalf. The amount you have to pay will depend on the individual battery compliance scheme and the amount of batteries you produce or market.

Register with your environmental regulator

You must register with your environmental regulator using the National Packaging Waste Database (NPWD) if you produce or place on the market:

  • one tonne or less of portable batteries per year
  • industrial or automotive batteries.

You must apply to be registered using the NPWD within 28 days of the first day you place batteries on the market.

National Waste Packaging Database (NWPD)

Contact your environmental regulator

If you export batteries or products containing batteries to other EU counties you will have to register with the regulators in those countries and comply with local regulations.

For more information, read our guidance for battery producers.

Batteries regulations

Take back waste industrial batteries free of charge

If you produce industrial batteries you must take back waste batteries free of charge from customers if:

  • you supply new batteries
  • the end user can't return waste batteries to their actual producer and you have previously placed the same type of battery on the market
  • the end user can't return waste batteries to any other producer.

For more information, read our guidance for producers of industrial and automotive batteries.

Collect vehicle batteries for free

If you produce vehicle batteries you must collect waste vehicle batteries free of charge from the final holders, such as civic amenity sites or garages.

What you must do if you sell or distribute batteries

Take waste batteries free of charge

If you are a retailer or distributor and you sell more than 32kg of portable batteries you must take back waste batteries in-store for free. If you only supply batteries contained in products you do not have to take back waste batteries in store.

Dispose of waste batteries correctly

You must not incinerate or landfill vehicle and industrial batteries.

If you collect batteries, you must:

  • send them for treatment or recycling at an approved batteries treatment centre, or
  • send them abroad for treatment or recycling by an approved battery exporter.

You will need to deal with all unsorted waste batteries and some other waste batteries as hazardous/special waste.

Good practice

Recycle waste batteries.

Use rechargeable batteries in the equipment and machinery you produce and service.

Store batteries safely and ensure that drainage from your store goes to the foul treatment system.

Further information on manufacturing and importing batteries

Batteries

GOV.UK: Government guidance notes on Waste batteries and accumulators regulations

GOV.UK: Government guidance notes on the Batteries and accumulators (placing on the market) regulations 2009

British Battery Manufacturers Association

This guidance is relevant if your business manufactures boilers.

You must handle boiler insulating materials carefully, including:

  • dry refractory, which you mix with water to produce a slurry
  • styrofoam
  • polystyrene
  • fibreglass.

What you must do

Comply with your permit, licence or exemption

If you have a permit, licence or exemption you must comply with its conditions. If you do not comply with conditions you can be fined or even sent to prison.

Prevent nuisance

You must not cause a nuisance to your neighbours from:

  • dust, eg if you use boiler refractory
  • odour, eg if you use styrene foams.

You should check whether your business is near sites that air pollution would particularly affect, such as hospitals, schools and residential areas.

If your processes create levels of dust, grit, fumes or smoke that could cause a nuisance or harm the health of the surrounding community, your local council can issue an abatement notice that:

  • requires you to reduce the nuisance
  • bans or restricts the nuisance
  • requires you to carry out work or take other steps to reduce or stop the nuisance.

Anyone who is affected by the nuisance, such as your neighbours, can apply to the court in Northern Ireland or sheriff in Scotland to issue you with an abatement notice.

You can be fined if you do not comply with an abatement notice, and the local council can take steps to stop the nuisance itself and charge you for its costs.

Noise, odour and other nuisances

Comply with your waste responsibilities

You must comply with your waste responsibilities when you deal with waste from your boiler insulation materials.

If you produce waste that contains refractory ceramic fibre or asbestos you will need to treat it as hazardous/special waste.

Special controls apply to asbestos waste. For more information, see our guidance on asbestos.

Good practice

Be a good operator

Minimise the volume of refractory materials you handle. This will reduce the amount of dust you create at your site.

Use styrene foams in a well ventilated area.

Mix your refractory batches carefully to avoid using too much or too little water. If you use excessive amounts of water you will cause run-out over extended periods while the refractory dries.

Only mix the amount of refractory that is required to fill the boilers you manufacture.

Store your materials safely

Store your refractory materials away from draughts.

Reseal any open bags of refractory materials carefully.

Manage your waste

Dispose of waste refractory separately from other wastes because it is heavy and dense.

Employ a licensed contractor if you are not qualified to remove asbestos. For further information, see our guidance on asbestos.

Design and technology courses, or craft and design courses in Scotland, involve the use of a range of materials. This includes metals, wood, plastics and electrical and electronic components and equipment. Some of these materials may have hazardous properties which will affect how you store, handle and dispose of them.

What you must do

Storage

If you supply a potentially hazardous chemical, you may have to provide a safety data sheet (SDS). The SDS tells the user how to handle, store and dispose of hazardous chemicals.

For guidance about when to provide an SDS and what it should include, see the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) leaflet.

HSE: REACH and safety data sheets (Adobe PDF - 111KB)

If you don't receive an SDS with a chemical, you can contact the supplier and ask for one. Suppliers who do not provide adequate instructions for using their products safely may be breaking the law.

You must make sure that your business does not cause a nuisance to your neighbours or the local community. Nuisances include smoke, dust, odour, noise and vibration. Anyone affected by a nuisance can take legal action against you or your business, or complain to your local council.

If your business causes a nuisance, or could cause or repeat a nuisance, you can be issued with an abatement notice. Your local council's environmental health department or the courts can issue abatement notices. You can be fined if you do not comply with an abatement notice.

An abatement notice can:

  • stop or impose restrictions on your operations
  • require you to carry out works or take other steps to restrict or remove the nuisance.

For further information see our guidance on Noise, odour and other nuisances.

Waste

Most businesses produce some waste that is harmful to humans and the environment. In Northern Ireland you may need to treat this waste as hazardous waste. In Scotland, you may need to treat this waste as special waste.

You must follow regulations for dealing with hazardous/special waste.

Hazardous/special waste includes common business materials and substances such as:

  • computer monitors
  • batteries
  • fluorescent tubes.

Before you reuse, recover, recycle or dispose of waste containers, you must check whether their contents are classified as hazardous/special waste. Read the label on the container or the relevant safety data sheet to help you do this.

If the contents are classified as hazardous, then you must treat the entire container as hazardous/special waste.

Your supplier may take back containers to reuse or recycle them.

Good practice

Plan carefully to minimise the quantity of materials you use and the waste material you produce. You can re-use off-cuts and unused material from one lesson in another lesson.

Separate all waste materials and store them in sealed labelled containers. A range of materials can be collected for recycling.

Reduce, reuse and recycle your business waste

Ensure that all materials are stored in a secure designated area.

When purchasing wood products check that they have the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) logo. This is the only internationally recognised certificate that ensures that timber has been produced in a sustainably managed forest.

Further information

NetRegs provides extensive guidance for businesses involved in the manufacture, assembly and installation of electrical and electronic equipment, metals, plastics and wood products. Although aimed at businesses, this guidance provides useful information for anyone who runs courses which involve practical elements such as wiring, design, assembly or repair of electrical or electronic equipment, or installation of this equipment in domestic or industry settings.

Machinery and electrical equipment

Metals production and processing

Rubber and plastic products

Wood and timber products

Useful links

CLEAPSS: School science and technology resources (Northern Ireland)

Scottish Schools Equipment Research Centre

The Nuffield Foundation: Secondary design and technology

The Nuffield Foundation: Primary design and technology

The Design and Technology Association

The Design Technology Department

Detergents are chemical substances containing soaps and surfactants that are used for washing and cleaning and can be in any form - powder, tablet, liquid or paste.

They can have significant impacts on the water environment, releasing organic chemicals which can be toxic to fish and other aquatic life. Ingredients may also not readily break down and cause long-lasting pollution in the environment.

What you must do

Label your detergent products

If you manufacture or place on the market any detergents you must include certain information on the label of your products including:

The name or trade name of the detergent.

Your business address and phone number.

The basic ingredients of the detergent. You do not need to include precise formula details. Certain ingredients, eg fragrances, must be listed in any case. The only ingredients you need to list in percentage ranges are those with a concentration above 0.2%.

List your detergent ingredients

You must produce a detailed list of the ingredients in your detergents as part of the product's safety data sheet (SDS). This must be available on request to health professionals treating allergies. The information will be kept confidential.

You should provide a basic version of this list on the internet. If you do not have a website your trade association may be able to include it on their website.

Chemicals industry trade associations

Ensure your surfactants are biodegradable

Surfactants are active ingredients which help a detergent or cleaning product remove dirt from surfaces.

If you manufacture detergents containing surfactants for the domestic sector you must ensure that the surfactants are ultimately biodegradable and so are easily broken down by bacteria into harmless chemicals.

If you manufacture detergents containing surfactants for the industrial or institutional sectors which are not ultimately biodegradable, you can apply for a derogation (permission to carry out an otherwise banned activity) from the Chemicals Regulation Directorate (CRD), part of the Health and Safety Executive (HSE). To do so you must ensure that your product passes the minimum legal standards for primary biodegradability.

Primary biodegradability is the first stage in the breaking-down of surfactants, after which they are usually less dangerous to the living environment.

HSE: Chemicals Regulation Directorate

You must keep the results of surfactant biodegradability testing which must be available to the CRD.

The CRD has produced further guidance on complying with the detergent legislation.

HSE: Chemicals Regulation Directorate - Detergents

Restricted chemicals

REACH places restrictions on marketing and using certain chemical substances and preparations, including some surfactants.

You should check the ingredients used in your detergent or cleaning product against Annex 17 (XVII) of the REACH Regulation which contains a list of restricted chemicals and their restrictions and concentration limits.

Restrictions on using hazardous chemicals

From 1 January 2015 you must not manufacture or put on the market domestic laundry cleaning products (DLCPs) containing more than 0.4% of their weight of inorganic phosphates.

HSE: Chemicals Regulation Directorate - Detergents

Further information on detergents

GOV.UK: Green claims guidance (Adobe PDF - 84 KB)

UK Cleaning Products Industry Association (UKCPI)

What you must do

You must strictly control your use of 'blue colourant' (EC number 405-665-4 in the European Inventory of Existing Commercial Chemical Substances) for colouring leather articles. You cannot use it as a substance or in preparations at concentrations higher than 0.1% by mass.

Good practice

Consider using liquid dyes instead of powder dyes. This will help you prevent dust.

Handle and dispose of dyes with care. Make sure you do not spill dyes as treatment plants may not remove them from the effluent. Even a very small amount of dye can discolour a watercourse and could affect downstream water users.

You can use various types of organic and inorganic fertilisers in your forestry activities. These include mineral fertilisers, such as ammonium nitrate and triple superphosphate, and organic fertilisers such as manure, sewage sludge and urea.

The most appropriate fertiliser will depend on your site and on the crop that you are growing.

What you must do

Agricultural activities

The law regards tree nurseries and Christmas tree production as agricultural activities. This means that you must comply with agricultural regulations controlling the application of fertilisers on farms which do not apply to other forestry operations.

However it is considered good practice for all forestry operations to follow these regulations.

Many fertilisers contain nitrates, which, if you apply the fertiliser incorrectly, can leach into surface waters and groundwater.

Nitrate Vulnerable Zones (NVZs) are areas that have been designated as being more susceptible to negative effects of nitrates on the water environment.

You should find out whether you are within a Nitrate Vulnerable Zone. If you are within an NVZ you will need to follow certain rules. Use the links below to find out how to access the maps and to see a summary of the requirements.

NIEA: Nitrate Vulnerable Zones (NVZ) in Northern Ireland

Scottish Government: Nitrate Vulnerable Zones (NVZ) in Scotland

Good practice

There are codes of good practice to help you protect your land, water and the environment from pollution. If you are working within an NVZ you should follow the regulators' codes of good practice.

Waste exemptions

Nature conservation

Waste management licences

Codes of good agricultural practice

Applying fertilisers

Limit the amount of fertiliser that you use by carefully planning where you need it and how you will apply it.

You should pay attention to the timing, method and rate of fertiliser application to make sure that the trees can take up the fertiliser and to avoid polluting the environment. Only use fertilisers appropriate for the type of site, soil and tree crop.

If you want to spread waste or sewage sludge on land as a fertiliser you must have an environmental permit, waste management licence or registered exemption. To find out more, see our guidance on landspreading.

Landspreading waste

Landspreading sewage sludge

See also Forestry Commission guidance on landspreading, sewage sludge and soil conservation.

Forestry Commission: Use of sewage sludge and composts in forestry (Adobe PDF - 180KB)

Forestry Commission: Forests and soil conservation guidelines

Forestry Commission: Nutrition of sitka spruce on upland restock sites (Adobe PDF - 490KB)

Separate advice is available in Northern Ireland from the Forest Service.

Northern Ireland Forest Service

Protecting the water environment

Contact your environmental regulator and your water company or water authority if you plan to apply fertiliser by air. You will need to find out how sensitive local watercourses are.

Check the weather forecast - don't apply any fertilisers if heavy rain is due.

If you apply urea you must be careful to avoid contaminating watercourses. Urea is extremely toxic to fish, and this is increased where the surface waters are alkaline (with a pH of 8 or more). You should take extra care in such areas.

Heavy rainfall after you have applied urea could result in high ammonia concentrations in surrounding streams. This can cause problems if your water company or water authority, or a private supplier, abstracts this water for drinking.

Do not apply fertilisers if the ground is waterlogged, frozen, snow-covered or, at the other extreme, baked dry. This is when the risk of wash-off is at its greatest.

Apply fertiliser by hand in areas close to riverbanks, and avoid land that could end up under water.

In areas that drain into sensitive water bodies, consider:

  • applying fertiliser by hand or ground machine
  • phasing aerial treatments over several years
  • using slower release fertilisers.

Forestry Commission: Forests and water guidelines (Adobe PDF - 3.44MB)

Storing and handling fertilisers

Avoid storing large quantities of fertiliser. Store only as much as you think you will use.

Store fertilisers:

  • at least 10 metres away from watercourses or field drains
  • under cover
  • away from sources of ignition
  • where there is no risk of flooding
  • where the risk of damage from vehicle movements or vandalism is low.

If you are storing waste materials such as sewage sludge for landspreading you can store up to 1250 tonnes of waste material, or 1000 tonnes in Northern Ireland, at the place where it is to be used for landspreading. You must make sure that the material is stored at least:

  • 10m from inland or coastal waters
  • 50m from a well, borehole or similar structure that is used as a water supply other than for a domestic supply
  • 250m from a well, borehole or similar structure used for domestic water supply.

You must not store sewage sludge for more than six months.

Bund your storage tanks. A bund is a secondary containment area that holds liquids if the main containers leak or break. The bund should be able to hold the contents of your tank plus an extra 10%.

Inspect your tanks and pipework regularly (at least once a year) for signs of damage.

Lock valves shut on tanks if the fertiliser could leak away when the valve is accidentally opened.

When washing spreaders after use, do not allow the water to enter a drain or waterway.

Have a pollution incident response procedure for dealing with spills. Ensure your staff are familiar with the procedure and how to implement it. Report pollution incidents as soon as they happen to the incident hotline on 0800 80 70 60.

PPG 21 Pollution incident response planning (Adobe PDF – 318KB))

Forestry Commission: Forests and climate change guidelines (Adobe PDF - 6.5MB)

You must never allow food or food ingredients to enter watercourses or surface water drains, as they can cause water pollution. Naturally occurring bacteria in the water use the food to multiply and at the same time they remove oxygen from the water. Without oxygen the fish and small insects in the watercourses cannot survive.

What you must do

If you cause or allow surface water or groundwater pollution you may be committing an offence and may be prosecuted and fined or imprisoned.

If you store oil,such as vegetable oil on your premises you may need to comply with the oil storage regulations. Even if these regulations do not apply to your business, you should consider meeting their requirements as they are designed to prevent pollution.

Oil storage

Good practice

Store all liquids, such as milk, fruit juice and molasses, where you can contain any spills. This should be in an impermeable bund, or secondary containment system (SCS). The SCS should contain at least 110% of the largest tank, or 25% of the total volume of the liquid that you are likely to store, whichever is the greater.

Inspect your SCS regularly and remove any rainwater. If the water is contaminated you may need to deal with it as hazardous/special waste.

Hazardous / special waste

To prevent damage, use collision barriers if storage areas are close to traffic routes.

Connect the drains from delivery areas to the foul drainage system (sewers), as contamination is very likely in these areas. Use rollover bunds, ramps or stepped access to isolate delivery areas from the surface water system.

Where possible locate delivery areas under cover to prevent run-off becoming contaminated with material from spills.

To reduce the risk of spills, supervise deliveries of raw materials to your site.

If possible, run pipelines above ground and protect them from collision damage. If you install a pipeline below ground, you should:

  • place it in a leakproof, protective sleeve or duct
  • put inspection chambers at joints as these are where leaks are most likely to occur
  • inspect and test the pipeline regularly.

You must not connect pipeline ducts to the surface water system. This could cause pollution.

Have a pollution incident response procedure for dealing with spills. Ensure your staff understand the procedure and know how to follow it.

Report pollution incidents to the incident hotline as soon as they happen on 0800 80 70 60.

Pollution incident response planning

Keep spill kits near to where you might need them with clear instructions for their use. Make sure your < staff know where they are and how to use them.

They can contain:

  • absorbent materials, eg sand
  • containment equipment, eg booms
  • pumps and suction equipment
  • pipe blockers
  • drain mats.

Make an inventory of all the equipment and materials you have on site. These should be suitable for the type and quantity of fuel, oil and chemicals you store and use.

Train all staff in what to do in the event of a spill and how to use any spill equipment.

Report pollution incidents immediately to the emergency hotline on 0800 80 70 60.

If you can produce greener or more sustainable chemicals and chemical products you can reduce their environmental or health impacts and you could reduce your costs.

Green chemistry

Green chemistry means designing chemical products and processes that use and produce fewer or no polluting or hazardous materials.

Green chemistry applies across the full life cycle of a chemical. You have to think about:

  • how you select the raw materials used for manufacture
  • how you produce the chemical and the energy used
  • the cost of disposing of the chemical and its environmental impacts
  • the potential for reuse or recycling the chemical
  • whether the chemical should be produced at all.

If you apply the principles of green chemistry in your business and to your products you could improve efficiency, reduce waste and produce safer chemicals for users.

For example, you could use green chemistry in developing new catalysts or substitutes for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) used in solvents and adhesives.

University of York: The Green Chemistry Centre of Excellence

The Green Chemistry Network (GCN

Energy labelling and eco-design

Chemsec has developed an online resource, the Marketplace,  where businesses can source alternatives to chemicals that have health or environmental impacts. If you produce safer chemicals then you can also present your alternatives to potential customers.

Chemsec: the Marketplace

Environmental management systems

Your business can reduce its environmental impact by using an environmental management system (EMS). An EMS helps you to manage your activities, including emissions and discharges, resource use, and waste in a planned way. This can help you to improve your overall efficiency as well as your environmental performance.

You could also reduce your costs and improve your reputation amongst staff, customers and the public.

Your EMS should be appropriate to the type and size of your operations.

For more information on how an EMS can help your business see our guidance on Environmental Management Systems.

Further information on improving environmental performance

Resource Efficient Scotland: Environmental Management Systems

This guidance is relevant if you manufacture, import or sell light bulbs or lamps.

Restrictions on the type of lamps and light bulbs you can manufacture, import or sell are being introduced to improve energy efficiency and reduce mercury emissions from lamps.

The restrictions will be introduced in stages until only the most efficient types of bulb are left on the market by 2016.

What you must do

Phase out incandescent and conventional halogen lamps

Traditional filament incandescent bulbs and conventional halogen bulbs used for lighting whole rooms, known as 'non-directional' lamps, are being phased out. This does not include spotlight bulbs or other special use bulbs.

Traditional filament incandescent bulbs use a thread-like conductor surrounded by an inert gas. They are very inefficient and have a short lifespan.

Conventional halogen bulbs use a similar thread-like conductor to incandescent bulbs, but use halogen gas.

You must not produce or import:

  • clear incandescent bulbs of 100 watts or more
  • non-clear incandescent bulbs (eg frosted or pearl glass)
  • 75 watt clear incandescent bulbs or lamps
  • 60 watt clear incandescent bulbs or lamps from
  • any incandescent bulbs or lamps from 1 September 2012.

If you are a retailer you will no longer be able to purchase 100 watt traditional filament incandescent bulbs. You can continue selling old bulbs that do not meet these energy efficiency standards until you have sold all your stock.

Meet minimum light bulb and lamp energy efficiency ratings

If you produce or import any household products containing light bulbs or lamps, you must ensure that they meet minimum energy efficiency standards.

  • Lamps and bulbs which have an equivalent light output of 100 watts or above must have a minimum C class energy efficiency rating.
  • Non-clear lamps (eg frosted or pearl glass) must have a minimum A class energy efficiency rating.
  • All clear replacement bulbs must have a minimum B class energy efficiency rating from 1 September 2018. Replacement conventional halogen bulbs with a C class energy efficiency rating will be banned.

If you are a retailer you can continue selling old bulbs that do not meet these energy efficiency standards until you have sold all your stock.

Low voltage halogen lamps and halogen lamps that use xenon gas and have a C class or lower energy efficiency rating will be banned after 2018.

Lamp types that will be permitted after 2018 include:

  • halogen lamps using infrared coating that have an A or B class energy efficiency rating
  • compact fluorescent lamps that meet the required design requirements
  • light-emitting diodes (LEDs).

Meet design requirements for compact fluorescent lamps

Compact fluorescent lamps are self-contained gas exchange lamps which can be used in conventional light fittings. They use a coiled fluorescent tube, often enclosed by a glass envelope.

  • lifespan (continuous use and switch cycles)
  • premature failure rate
  • starting and warm up time
  • radiance output.

You can find the full performance standards in Annex II of the regulations. This includes the performance standards required from 2013.

EU Regulation on ecodesign requirements for non-directional household lamps 244/2009 (Adobe PDF - 94KB)

EU Regulation on ecodesign requirements on ultraviolet radiation of non-directional household lamps 859/2009, amending table 5 of Annex II EU Regulation 244/2009 (Adobe PDF - 800KB)

Provide product information

If you produce or import non-directional household bulbs or lamps, used for lighting whole rooms, you must provide information for end-users on the light bulb packaging and on an open access website.

You don't have to do this for bulbs that were banned after 1 September 2012 (for example, incandescent bulbs).

The information must include the lamp's:

  • power and wattage
  • rated luminous flux
  • size
  • lifespan (hours and switch cycles)
  • temperature in Kelvin
  • warm up time.

If the lamp contains mercury you must include guidance on how to dispose of the lamp and how to clean it up if it breaks.

You can find the full labelling requirements in Annex II of the regulations.

EU Regulation on ecodesign requirements for non-directional household lamps 244/2009 (Adobe PDF - 94KB)

Provide product information on special purpose lamps

A special purpose lamp is a lamp that is not intended for illuminating whole rooms.

If you manufacture or import special purpose lamps you must clearly display on the packaging:

  • the intended purpose of the lamp
  • that the lamp is not suitable for household use.

You must also comply with ecodesign requirements in EU Regulation 245/2009.

EU Regulation on ecodesign requirements for fluorescent lamps without integrated ballast, for high intensity discharge lamps, and for ballasts and luminaires able to operate such lamps 245/2009 (Adobe PDF - 209KB)

EU Regulation amending EU Regulation 245/2009 on ecodesign requirements for fluorescent lamps without integrated ballast, for high intensity discharge lamps, and for ballasts and luminaires able to operate such lamps 347/2010 (Adobe PDF - 892KB)

Reduce hazardous substances in lamps

All lamps must not contain more than 1.23 mg of mercury.

They must also comply with the restriction of hazardous substances in electrical and electronic equipment (RoHS) regulations. Read our RoHS guidance.

Dispose of gas discharge lamps safety

Energy efficient lamps are covered by the waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) regulations. They must be disposed of correctly at the end of their life. If you produce or import energy saving lamps you must join a producer compliance scheme (PCS).

List of approved producer compliance schemes in the UK (Adobe PDF - 244KB)

Further information

The Carbon Trust: Low energy lighting

Lighting industry Association

You must store, handle and dispose of medicines safely to avoid pollution incidents.

What you must do

You must keep a register of all the medicines that are on your premises.

Storing medicines

You must properly and safely store all medicines that are bought and obtained by prescription to ensure the safety of others.

Some prescription-only medicines are classified as controlled drugs, eg morphine, pethidine and methadone. You must store these separately from other medicines in pharmacy and healthcare practices.

NHS Scotland: Safer management of controlled drugs

DHSSPS Northern Ireland: Controlled drugs

Disposing of medicines

You must dispose of medicines through specialist disposal methods. They are normally disposed of through specialist incineration. You must never dispose of them down the sink or drain.

Pharmaceutical waste

You must make arrangements for the safe management of all waste medicines. This is part of your duty of care.

The Duty of Care affects all businesses. You must make sure:

  • your waste is stored, handled, recycled or disposed of safely and legally
  • your waste is stored, handled, recycled or disposed of only by licensed individuals or businesses
  • you record all transfers of waste between your business and another business, using a waste transfer note (WTN)
  • you keep all WTNs, signed by both businesses, for at least two years
  • you record any transfer of hazardous/special waste between your business and another business, using a consignment note
  • you keep all consignment notes, signed by both businesses, for at least three years.

Duty of care - your waste responsibilities

Hazardous / special waste

Waste carriers, brokers and dealers

Medicines that are hazardous/special waste

Some medicines are classified as hazardous/special waste. Hazardous/special waste is waste that may cause harm to human health or the environment.

Hazardous/special waste

Cytotoxic and cytostatic medicinal wastes are classified as hazardous/special waste. Cytotoxic and cytostatic medicines are medicines that are either toxic, carcinogenic, mutagenic or toxic for reproduction.

Cytotoxic and cytostatic waste

The classification of medicines as hazardous/special waste is very complex. The environmental regulators provide guidance to help you assess if your waste is hazardous/special.

Northern Ireland Environment Agency: Hazardous waste

SEPA: Hazardous waste - interpretation of the definition and classification of hazardous waste

Good practice

Storing medicines

Store medicines in their original container or in the container they were dispensed in.

Store all medicines in a designated locked area.

Keep liquid medicines separate from other medicines in tablet or powder form, even when they are in their original container. This is to prevent cross-contamination through spills and leaks.

Store medicines in a safe place and away from children and animals. You should prevent unnecessary accumulation of stored medicines.

Where available, you should keep a copy of the Safety Data Sheet (SDS). If an SDS is not provided with the medicine you may request a copy from the manufacturer or importer of the medicine. The MSDS gives information on how chemicals should be handled, stored and disposed of, and what to do in the case of an accident.

Further information

The Medicines and Healthcare Regulatory Authority (MHRA) is responsible for ensuring that medicines and medical devices work and are acceptably safe.

Medicines and Healthcare Regulatory Authority (MHRA)

For information on metal working as part of secondary school courses, see our Design and Technology/Craft and Design guidance.

Design and technology/craft and design materials

Further or higher education establishments which run courses teaching the skills associated with processes used in industry and business can find useful guidance in the NetRegs guidance for metal working businesses.

Fabricated metal products

Surface treatment of metals

What you must do

You will need a Part B pollution prevention and control (PPC) permit if you use gypsum that is a by-product of another activity, and your process includes:

  • crushing, grinding or other ways of reducing the size of gypsum
  • grading, screening or heating gypsum.

If you receive or recycle damaged plasterboard or other plaster products for reprocessing, you may need a permit, licence or to register an exemption.

You may qualify for a waste exemption if you manufacture plasterboard from waste that consists of paper or gypsum.

The exemption references are:

  • paragraph 14 exemption in Northern Ireland
  • paragraph 13 exemption in Scotland.

If you have an exemption, you must comply with the exemption conditions.

You must register this exemption with your environmental regulator.

You must still ensure that your activity does not:

  • endanger human health or cause pollution to water, air or soil
  • cause a risk to plants or animals
  • cause a nuisance in terms of noise, dust, fumes, smoke or odour
  • adversely affect the countryside or places of special interest.

Waste management licences

Because they contain high levels of sulphate, you must separate plaster, plasterboard and other gypsum products from your general wastes.

You must dispose of non-hazardous gypsum-based materials in landfills for non-hazardous waste, in cells where there is no biodegradable waste. You must dispose of gypsum-based materials that are classified as hazardous waste in hazardous waste landfills.

Scotland: The disposal in landfills for non-hazardous waste of gypsum wastes (Adobe PDF - 24KB)

This guidance covers delivery, transfer and storage of dry raw materials. Your supplier may deliver dry raw materials to your site on wagons, and you may then transfer them to storage areas by conveyers. They may be stored in stockpiles or stock pens.

Handling, mixing and drying of raw materials can release particulates into the air and can cause air pollution. Particulates are small, airborne fragments such as dust.

What you must do

If you dry sand or other minerals you will need to comply with the requirements set out in the 'Process Guidance Note 3/15b (04) Secretary of State's Guidance for Mineral Drying and Cooling'.

GOV.UK: PG3/18 Mineral Drying and Cooling

Good practice

These methods can reduce the amount of raw material your process uses, the amount of water you use for washing down and the amount of wastewater you produce.

If you receive deliveries of dusty materials, you should:

  • have materials delivered in enclosed containers or sealed bags
  • use an enclosed delivery method such as pipelines or covered conveyors
  • use oil dampened or wetted materials
  • where possible, substitute granular alternatives for dusty materials
  • use covered wagons or covered rail trucks
  • unload in a covered, enclosed area
  • maintain a high standard of housekeeping on-site.

Where possible, store all dusty, or potentially dusty, materials in fully enclosed containers, such as in silos, or in confined storage areas within buildings.

If you store materials outside:

  • locate stockpiles and conveyors as far away as possible from residential properties
  • protect them from wind whipping, for example by covering them, and by using fencing and other containment methods
  • where possible, use storage bays
  • use dust suppression techniques during dry weather on areas of the site that will give rise to dust clouds.

If you transfer dry materials from wagons to storage areas using a conveyer, you can reduce spillage by:

  • controlling the delivery speed to maintain careful delivery practices
  • using a collection method, for example plastic sheeting beneath conveyers, to catch any spillages and transfer them directly into the storage area
  • adjusting the drop-off height of the conveyors.

If you sample delivered material on receipt, you should carry out the sampling within an enclosed area, and preferably under cover.

Where necessary, use wheel-washing facilities at exits onto public highways.

Wheel washing at construction sites

Metal powders are mixed with other ingredients to produce a uniform composition. Lubricants include stearic acid, stearin and metallic stearates, particularly zinc stearate.

The powder mix is compacted under pressure into the required form in a rigid steel or carbide die at ambient temperature. The compact maintains shape through the cold welding of the powder.

What you must do

Powder blending and compacting can have significant impacts on air quality and can cause noise pollution. You may need to take measures to control emissions to air and noise from your premises.

Air quality

You must comply with your duty of care responsibilities when dealing with waste.

Duty of care - your waste responsibilities

If the material that you are handling has hazardous properties, you may need to deal with it as hazardous/special waste. Examples of substances that may have hazardous properties include:

  • obsolete zinc stearate
  • zinc and copper
  • lead flue dusts
  • lead drosses.

Hazardous / special waste

Good practice

  • Contain and cover powders to avoid producing excessive amounts of dust.
  • To prevent dust blowing around your site, collect excess powder from the ejection of compacts from the die. Collect the powder in containers placed as close to the source as possible.
  • Locate presses as far away as possible from the site boundary. It may be necessary to contain presses in acoustic booths. This will help you to prevent causing a noise nuisance.
  • Keep doors to the factory closed to contain noise and reduce draughts that could blow powder around.
  • Contact your local plastics recycler to arrange collection of your nylon powder bags.
  • Carefully inspect compacted parts so that you can recycle obvious rejects before sintering.

This guidance is relevant to your business if you supply timber or wood-derived products to UK government departments, their executive agencies and non-departmental public bodies.

All government departments, agencies and bodies must buy all their timber and wood-derived products from either legal and sustainable sources or Forest Law Enforcement, Governance and Trade (FLEGT) licensed or equivalent sources.

Some other public bodies, such as local councils, have also adopted similar responsible timber procurement policies.

As a supplier you need to be aware of the government's timber procurement policy and how this might affect your business. Remember you may be part of a larger supply chain.

If you import FLEGT licenced timber or timber products into the EU you will require a FLEGT licence. The National Measurements and Regulation Office (NMRO) can provide information about licences.

NMRO: flegtenquiries@nmro.gov.uk

A digital service is being developed and this means you may need to complete a paper and electronic application. More information is available at:

UKNMO:  UK-specific FLEGT FAQs

If you import FLEGT-licensed timber, you will be required to submit the electronic FLEGT licence for verification to Regulatory Delivery before the timber arrives in the UK. Under an interim licence verification process, the FLEGT licence should be emailed to flegtenquiries@beis.gov.uk, along with a completed copy of the FLEGT licence verification form. This form is available at https://www.gov.uk/flegt.

Providing that the original licence was issued electronically, there is no need for the operator to submit a hard, paper copy to Regulatory Delivery; a submission of the electronic licence will suffice for verification purposes. The cost of licence verification is £9.60 per licence. Operators will be invoiced at the end of the current financial year in order to collect payment for licences verified from 15 November 2016.

Regulatory Delivery will continue to develop the UK FLEGT online system; it is anticipated that this will launch early in 2017. A Customs Information Paper on the import process for FLEGT-licensed products can be found at https://www.gov.uk/publications/FLEGT. If you use a freight forwarder or agent please check that they are aware of these requirements.

The EC has developed a website as an information point for FLEGT licences. It has a comprehensive Frequently Asked Question section.

FLEGT Licenced Timber - Essential Information

The cost of a FLEGT licence has been reduced - from £31 to £9.60

Does the timber procurement policy apply to your business?

The policy applies to your business if you supply timber or wood-derived products for use by a:

  • central government department, eg the Ministry of Defence
  • executive agency, eg Highways Agency or
  • non-departmental public body, eg Scottish Natural Heritage or the Northern Ireland Environment Agency.

What does the timber procurement policy cover?

The policy covers materials and products including:

  • timber used in construction, including as part of temporary site works, eg joists, window and door frames, site hoardings, formwork etc.
  • office furniture, eg desks, shelving etc.
  • office products, eg paper, notebooks, other stationery items etc.
  • packaging materials or products, eg cardboard packaging, pallets etc.
  • wood chips for producing energy
  • fencing.

If you supply any of these materials and products to government departments, agencies or bodies you must check that they come from approved sources.

You should check the origin of your materials or products. If necessary ask your suppliers for details.

You must be able to provide evidence that your products comply with the timber procurement policy if requested. The evidence should state the source of the timber or product and prove that this source is legally and sustainably managed. For example, you could use chain of custody certificates from the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) or the Programme for the Endorsement of Forest Certification schemes (PEFC).

Further information on the timber procurement policy

The Central Point of Expertise on Timber (CPET) provides free advice and guidance to public sector buyers and their suppliers about the timber procurement policy and how to comply.

If you are not sure whether your product is covered by the policy or what type of evidence will be accepted contact the CPET Helpline or see their website for further advice.

Email: cpet@proforest.net

CPET Helpline: 01865 243766

CPET

CPET:UK Policy -Timber procurement for public sector

CPET: UK Government's Timber Procurement Advice Note (2013) (Adobe PDF - 594KB)

Scottish Government: Scottish Procurement Policy Note SPPN 09/2004 Procurement of Timber and Timber Products (Adobe PDF - 128KB)

Scottish Government: Scottish Procurement Policy Note 9 of 2005 Timber and Timber Products

Northern Ireland Executive: Procurement Guidance Note 04/06 - Procurement of Timber and Wood Products (Adobe PDF - 235KB)

WWF: Responsible sourcing of forest products

The materials and substances that you use in your business all have an impact on the environment. By carefully selecting your raw materials you can reduce this impact and reduce your costs.

What you must do

You must store and handle raw materials carefully at all stages of processing and manufacture. If you cause pollution to air, land or water, or risk causing damage to the environment, you are committing an offence.

Use safety data sheets

A safety data sheet (SDS) must accompany any material supplied to you that contains hazardous substances. The SDS gives information on how chemicals should be handled, stored and disposed of.

If you use chemicals or chemical products you must make all staff aware of the SDS for any hazardous substance or mixtures that they handle, store or dispose of. If you receive a chemical without a SDS, contact your supplier to find out whether or not they have to provide one.

Store substances to avoid pollution

Oil and chemicals can be particularly damaging to human health and the environment. You must store and handle these appropriately to prevent pollution.

Oil storage

Chemical storage

Make sure that your material handling and storage areas do not cause air, noise or water pollution.

Air quality

Noise and vibration

Solvent emissions

Waste storage and transport

Good practice

Selecting raw materials

Audit the materials that you use in your process. If you use any hazardous substances consider using alternative less hazardous materials and practices. For example:

  • if you buy pulp, use reputable suppliers and only use elemental chlorine free (ECF) and totally chlorine free (TCF) grades
  • don't use timber, wood chips or hemp that have been sprayed with harmful substances such as lindane or pentachlorophenol (PCP)
  • use pesticide-free feedstock
  • environmentally friendly adhesives are now widely available, try to find one that meets your requirements
  • use water-based coatings in place of solvent-based ones
  • use biocides that degrade rapidly, eg guanidine and isothiazolones
  • use chemicals with high biodegradability, eg use DTPA as a chelant in place of EDTA or NTA
  • if you use sodium hydroxide (NaOH), use low mercury NaOH
  • don't use alkylphenol ethoxylates
  • don't use elemental chlorine
  • if it is compatible with the paper specification, you should use chalk rather than clay as a filler, as chalk retains water more efficiently.

Consider sourcing materials that are certified by an ecolabel or logo. Products displaying an ecolabel must meet strict requirements covering a range of environmental impacts. See our guidance on buying sustainable goods and services.

Consider the whole life cycle of the materials that you source, including the impacts of the raw material, your production process, the final product and its disposal. For example, is the material delivered in reusable packaging, does the material reduce the amount of waste that you produce, does the material reduce the amount of energy or water that your process requires?

Select materials that make it easier for you to minimise, reuse and recycle your waste. For example, if your grade of paper will allow, use materials delivered in pulpable bags.

Use your raw materials to maximum benefit to reduce the amount of waste that you produce. See our guidance on waste reduction, reuse and recycling.

Contact your suppliers for help with choosing materials.

For more guidance on how to manage and reduce your environmental impact see our guidance on managing your environmental performance.

This guidance is relevant if you sell electrical and electronic equipment (EEE). Examples of EEE include:

  • household appliances, eg fridges, kettles, washing machines
  • IT equipment, eg laptops, computer monitors
  • telephones and mobile phones
  • TV sets, radios, video or DVD players
  • electrical tools, eg drills, sanders, saws
  • gardening tools, eg hedge trimmers, lawn mowers
  • toys, eg video game consoles, electronic cars, train sets
  • medical equipment, eg cardiology machines
  • smoke detectors
  • dispensing machines, eg food and drink vending machines.

If you need to dispose of waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) that you produce in your business, see our WEEE guidance.

What you must do

Selling electrical and electronic equipment

If you sell EEE to end users, you must comply with the WEEE Regulations.

You must:

  • check that your suppliers are registered with your environmental regulator
  • provide information for your customers
  • have a take-back system for customers to dispose of their WEEE free of charge.

Rebranding or importing electrical and electronic equipment

If you rebrand or import EEE, you are considered a producer under the WEEE Regulations. This means you have a responsibility for the EEE you place on the market.

You must:

  • join a producer compliance scheme (PCS), who will register you with your environmental regulator as a producer of EEE
  • ensure that the EEE you place on the market is disposed of in an environmentally sound way
  • provide information to your PCS about the EEE you produce.

For more information about your obligations, see our guidance for producers of electrical and electronic equipment.

Further information on selling EEE

Waste electrical and electronic equipment

GOV.UK: WEEE

This guidance is relevant to your retail or wholesale business if you:

  • sell or distribute batteries
  • import batteries into the UK to sell
  • collect waste batteries.

Batteries regulations

The batteries regulations apply to distributors and producers of portable, industrial and automotive batteries.

You are a distributor if you sell or distribute batteries.

You are a producer if you import batteries, or goods containing batteries, or put batteries on the UK market for the first time.

You may have responsibilities as both a distributor and a producer.

Types of battery

Portable batteries are readily available for purchase by the general public or businesses, and are small enough to be carried by hand. Portable batteries include AA, AAA, C and D cells, button cells, mobile phone batteries and laptop batteries.

Products that use portable batteries include cameras, toys, laptops, cordless power tools, watches, electric toothbrushes and television remote controls.

An industrial battery is designed exclusively for industrial or professional use, such as batteries used in professional video equipment or studios, or in electric vehicles such as golf buggies.

An automotive battery is used for starting, lighting or ignition power for vehicles, including cars, motorcycles, vans, lorries, buses and tractors.

What you must do if you distribute portable batteries

Allow customers to return waste batteries

If you sell more than 32kg of portable batteries to end users per year, you must allow consumers to return waste batteries free of charge to your retail outlet. This applies if you sell batteries in a store, online or via mail order.

Use the Defra battery calculator to find out if you sell more than 32kg of batteries a year.

Defra: Battery calculator

Store and dispose of waste batteries correctly

Collect waste batteries in a secure container.

Contact a battery compliance scheme to collect the waste batteries. The collection will be free of charge.

Contact your environmental regulator for a list of battery compliance schemes.

Contact your environmental regulator

What you must do if you import portable batteries

Join a battery compliance scheme or register with your environmental regulator

If you import portable batteries, or goods containing batteries, or put portable batteries on the UK market for the first time, you must:

  • join a battery compliance scheme, or
  • register with your environmental regulator.

What you must do if you import industrial or automotive batteries

Register and take back waste batteries from your customers

If you import industrial or automotive batteries, or put them on the UK market for the first time, you must:

  • take back waste batteries free of charge from your customers
  • register with the Department for Business, Innovation & Skills (BIS) using the National Packaging Waste Database.

National Packaging Waste Database

Further information on the batteries regulations

Batteries regulations

GOV.UK: Placing batteries on the UK market

If you use, sell or supply chemical substances, you must comply with the REACH (Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and restriction of Chemicals) Regulation.

If you sell chemical substances, or items that contain chemicals, you must:

  • help your suppliers communicate with end users
  • pass on safety information to your customers (safety data sheets) when appropriate
  • respond to customer queries about chemical products
  • pass information from customers back to your suppliers, for example about new uses or safer methods.

If you manufacture chemicals or import chemicals from outside the European Union (EU) you will have additional duties under the REACH Regulation.

REACH applies to a very wide range of chemical substances, either on their own or in preparations and mixtures.

Preparations and mixtures that you may use or sell include:

  • coatings eg paints, varnishes or enamels
  • pigments, dyes or inks
  • kitchen and bathroom cleaning products
  • photograph processing chemicals
  • chemicals used to produce man-made fibres
  • hairdressing products, such as hair dyes
  • dry-cleaning solvents
  • pet care products
  • chemicals contained within articles, eg ink in printer cartridges or pens.

It may not be obvious that a product contains chemicals. For example, many items of clothing contain chemicals in the form of dyes, or phthalates in plastic buttons.

REACH also applies to chemical substances contained in finished products or articles, whether you are manufacturing or supplying them within the EU, or importing them from outside the EU.

UK REACH Competent Authority: What REACH means for EU importers (Adobe PDF - 221KB)

UK REACH Competent Authority: REACH guidance on articles (Adobe PDF - 110KB)

Exempt substances

Some chemical substances are partially or completely exempt from REACH. See the UK REACH Competent Authority guidance for further information about exemptions. Be aware that exemptions may change.

UK REACH Competent Authority: REACH - exemptions (Adobe PDF - 123KB)

Chemical substances inventory

You should make an inventory or list of chemical substances that your business uses, supplies, manufactures or imports. This will help you understand your responsibilities, what you need to do and the impact REACH will have on your business activities.

UK REACH Competent Authority: Creating an inventory for downstream users of chemicals including formulators (Adobe PDF - 111KB)

Chemical retailers and distributors' requirements

If you are a chemical retailer or distributor you also have responsibilities under REACH.

You must provide your customers with a safety data sheet with information on the substances you supply.

You must not supply a substance that has not been pre-registered or registered if the substance needs to be.

UK REACH Competent Authority: The distributors role in REACH (Adobe PDF - 96KB)

Your customers' use of any chemical must be covered by its REACH registration. To check this, you may need to tell your suppliers how your customers are using a chemical.

Reach registration 2018 represents the final deadline for the registration of phase-in substances which are manufactured or imported in quantities greater than 1 tonne per annum.

HSE: REACH Registration 2018

Chemicals users' requirements

You are a chemical user if as a part of your work you:

  • use any chemicals or preparations
  • formulate or blend chemical preparations or mixtures
  • use any chemicals, preparations or mixtures to produce articles.

If you use a chemical substance you must make sure that you:

  • identify and follow all appropriate safety measures identified by the chemical's safety data sheet, if required
  • use the substance within its safe exposure limits
  • comply with any restrictions or conditions of authorisation that have been placed on its use.

UK REACH Competent Authority: What REACH means for users of chemicals (Adobe PDF - 63KB)

Chemsec has developed an online resource, the Marketplace,  where businesses can source alternatives to chemicals that have health or environmental impacts. If you produce safer chemicals then you can also present your alternatives to potential customers.

Chemsec: the Marketplace

Information on chemicals use

You should check that your suppliers register all the ways you use the chemicals they supply. This is to make sure that your supply of chemicals will not be disrupted. This may not be necessary if you only use the chemical in the way your supplier intended.

If you have an unusual use for a substance, you should provide your suppliers with details of how you intend to use the chemical. This will allow them to include this information in their registration.

You can choose not to give your suppliers this information if you feel it will compromise your business. In this case you must carry out your own chemical safety assessment. You will normally have to provide this information to the European Chemicals Agency (ECHA) and any final users of the chemical.

ECHA: Chemical safety assessment and report

ECHA: Guidance in a nutshell - chemical safety assessment (Adobe PDF - 173KB)

Restricted chemicals

REACH places restrictions on the marketing and use of certain chemical substances on their own or in preparations. These include substances that are classified as persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic (PBT) in the environment.

There are two groups of chemicals:

  • substances of very high concern (SVHCs) and Annex XIV (14) substances that require an authorisation for their use
  • Annex XVII (17) substances whose marketing and use is restricted.

A substance can appear in both groups.

Chemicals requiring authorisation

REACH identifies substances with known high risks to human health or the environment as substances of very high concern (SVHCs) and Annex XIV substances. ECHA has produced a proposed candidate list of possible substances of very high concern and a recommended list of substances to be included in Annex XIV.

ECHA

If you supply an article containing a substance on the SVHC candidate list or Annex XIV you must give recipients information on the substance and how to use it safely.

If you supply a substance on its own or in a preparation or mixture you must provide recipients and customers with a safety data sheet.

Depending on which substance you supply and the amount you supply, you may also need to:

  • submit a notification to ECHA
  • get an authorisation for specific uses for that substance if it appears in Annex XIV.

The UK REACH competent authority has produced guidance on substances that require an authorisation.

UK REACH Competent Authority: Substances of very high concern (Adobe PDF - 94 KB)

Annex XVII substances

Annex XVII of REACH contains a list of restricted chemicals with the associated restrictions and concentration limits. More chemicals and restrictions may be added in the future.

Restricted chemicals include:

  • lead carbonates
  • lead sulphates
  • benzene
  • pentachlorophenol
  • nonylphenol and its ethoxylates
  • cadmium
  • hexachloroethane
  • creosote
  • compounds containing mercury and arsenic.

Annex XVII of REACH is subject to change, you should check it regularly to keep up to date with restrictions on the chemicals you are involved with.

Use the European Union law database and search using the terms 'REACH' with 'Annex XVII' in the simple search window (text search).

European Union: EUR-Lex database

If a chemical is listed in Annex XVII you must not:

  • market or use the chemical for the restrictions outlined
  • market or use any substances, preparations or article containing the chemical for the restrictions outlined
  • allow or cause anyone else to break the rules of a restriction.

Annex XVII chemicals are restricted to protect:

  • workers
  • consumers
  • the environment.

Enforcement of REACH

Different regulators enforce REACH depending on the chemical, your business type and part of the UK you operate in. To check, contact the HSE to find out which regulator you need to speak to.

Health and Safety Executive: REACH helpdesk

UK REACH Competent Authority: Enforcement

Manufacturers, importers and distributors

If you manufacture or import chemical substances into the EU you must comply with additional requirements. For more information see our guidance on the REACH Regulation.

REACH Regulation - manufacturing, importing, selling and using chemicals

Further information on complying with REACH

UK REACH competent authority guidance

Health and Safety Executive: REACH

UK REACH Competent Authority: What REACH means for manufacturers (Adobe PDF - 506KB)

UK REACH Competent Authority: What REACH means for EU importers (Adobe PDF - 221KB)

UK REACH Competent Authority: What REACH means for users of chemicals (Adobe PDF - 418KB)

UK REACH Competent Authority: The distributor's role in REACH (Adobe PDF - 96KB)

The HSE operates a UK REACH Competent Authority helpdesk which you can contact directly by email.

UK REACH Competent Authority helpdesk

Reach registration 2018 represents the final deadline for the registration of phase-in substances which are manufactured or imported in quantities greater than 1 tonne per annum.

HSE: REACH Registration 2018

European Chemicals Agency guidance

European Chemicals Agency: Guidance documents

ECHA has set up a helpdesk for queries relating to all aspects of REACH.

European Chemicals Agency: Contact ECHA

Other relevant NetRegs guidance

REACH regulation

Trade associations can help you find alternative chemicals and solutions.

Chemicals industry trade associations

What you must do

If you transfer powdered materials to storage silos using compressed air as a carrier medium, you must be careful that the silo does not become pressurised. If the silo becomes over-pressurised, it can rupture, or it can blow out the filter unit from that silo.

Any material that spills from a silo could cause pollution, particularly if it enters surface water drains or watercourses. Report pollution incidents as soon as they happen to the UK wide emergency hotline on 0800 80 70 60.

Excessive pressure can be caused by:

  • too much pressure in the air delivered from the tanker
  • using a filter in the silo that is too small for the flow of air through the silo or
  • using the wrong size of filter for the size of the silo.

Good practice

To reduce the risk of silo rupture:

  • avoid delivering materials to silos at a rate that will result in pressurisation, especially towards the end of the delivery when the amount of material entering the ducting is getting smaller and the air flow is increasing
  • calculate the correct filter size; it must match the rate that air flows through the silo
  • regularly clean filter systems to prevent blockages and prevent the accumulation of powder in the filter system
  • visually check for emissions during all deliveries
  • fit all new silos with an automatic system cut-off in the event of pressurisation or overfilling
  • regularly inspect plant and equipment, including transfer line connections, pressure relief valves and safety systems.

During all bulk deliveries, watch silo inlet connections and the silo arrestment plant to check for emissions.

Keep a record of the type of material being delivered, and the start and finish times of all deliveries to help trace the cause of any incidents.

Where your supplier uses a road vehicle to deliver material to silos, where possible this should be a tanker with an onboard (truck mounted) relief valve and filtration.

Fit alarms or volume indicators on bulk storage tanks and silos that contain dry materials to warn of overfilling.

If you hire, keep or transport waste skips, you must comply with environmental legislation.

This guidance does not cover other legal requirements that might apply to your skip hire business, such as local authority permission for skip use, planning permission, vehicle licensing or health and safety requirements.

What you must do

Check if you need to register as a waste carrier or broker

If you transport skips that contain waste, you must register as a waste carrier and keep waste transfer notes or consignment notes for hazardous waste.

Check if you need a permit, licence or registered exemption

If you keep skips that contain waste at your site, you are operating a waste transfer station and must have a waste management licence or registered exemption.

If you receive or treat waste at your site, you should see our guidance on receiving, storing and treating waste.

Receiving waste or sewage

Receiving hazardous/special waste

Storing waste or sewage

Treating WEEE

Treating hazardous/special waste

Comply with your waste duty of care

You must also comply with your waste duty of care requirements. For further information, see our guidance on your waste responsibilities.

If you use or supply chemical substances you must comply with the REACH (Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and restriction of Chemicals) Regulation.

If you manufacture chemicals or import chemicals from outside the European Union (EU) you will have additional duties under the REACH Regulation.

REACH applies to a wide range of chemical substances and chemicals in preparations or mixtures and articles.

Preparations or mixtures that you may use or supply include:

  • coatings, eg paints, varnishes or enamels
  • pigments or dyes, eg carbon black
  • cleaning products, eg surface degreasing agents containing solvents
  • chemicals used to produce manmade fibres including:
    - monomer substances, eg isoprene, styrene
    - anti-degradants, eg antioxidants or ultraviolet absorbers
    - plasticisers or other modifiers, eg extender oils
    - curing agents, eg sulphur or peroxides
    - catalysts or other process additives or aids, eg fillers, oils, release agents
  • chemicals contained within articles, eg ink in plastic printer cartridges.

REACH also applies to chemical substances contained in finished products or articles, whether you are manufacturing or supplying them within the EU, or importing them from outside the EU.

UK REACH Competent Authority: What REACH means for EU importers (Adobe PDF - 221KB)

UK REACH Competent Authority: REACH guidance on articles (Adobe PDF - 110KB)

Exempt substances

Some chemical substances are partially or completely exempt from REACH. See the UK REACH Competent Authority guidance for further information about exemptions. Be aware that exemptions may change.

UK REACH Competent Authority: REACH - exemptions (Adobe PDF - 123KB)

Chemical substances inventory

You should make an inventory or list of chemical substances that your business uses, supplies, manufactures or imports. This will help you understand your responsibilities, what you need to do and the impact REACH will have on your business activities.

UK REACH Competent Authority: Creating an inventory for downstream users of chemicals including formulators (Adobe PDF - 111KB)

Chemicals users' requirements

You are a chemical user if as a part of your work you:

  • use any chemicals or preparations
  • formulate or blend chemical preparations or mixtures
  • use any chemicals, preparations or mixtures to produce articles.

If you use a chemical substance you must make sure that you:

  • identify and follow all appropriate safety measures identified by the chemical's safety data sheet, if required
  • use the substance within its safe exposure limits
  • comply with any restrictions or conditions of authorisation that have been placed on its use.

UK REACH Competent Authority: What REACH means for users of chemicals (Adobe PDF - 63KB)

Information on chemicals use

You should check that your suppliers register all the ways you use the chemicals they supply. This is to make sure that your supply of chemicals will not be disrupted. This may not be necessary if you only use the chemical in the way your supplier intended.

If you have an unusual use for a substance, you should provide your suppliers with details of how you intend to use the chemical. This will allow them to include this information in their registration.

You can choose not to give your suppliers this information if you feel it will compromise your business. In this case you must carry out your own chemical safety assessment. You will normally have to provide this information to the European Chemicals Agency (ECHA) and any final users of the chemical.

ECHA: Chemical safety assessment and report

ECHA: Guidance in a nutshell - chemical safety assessment (Adobe PDF - 173KB)

Your supplier must not supply you with a substance that has not been pre-registered or registered if the substance needs to be.

Restricted chemicals

REACH places restrictions on the marketing and use of certain chemical substances on their own or in preparations. These include substances that are classified as persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic (PBT) in the environment.

There are two groups of chemicals:

  • substances of very high concern (SVHCs) and Annex XIV (14) substances that require an authorisation for their use
  • Annex XVII (17) substances whose marketing and use is restricted.

A substance can appear in both groups.

Chemicals requiring authorisation

REACH identifies substances with known high risks to human health or the environment as substances of very high concern (SVHCs) and Annex XIV substances. ECHA has produced a proposed candidate list of possible substances of very high concern and a recommended list of substances to be included in Annex XIV.

ECHA

If you supply an article containing a substance on the SVHC candidate list or Annex XIV you must give recipients information on the substance and how to use it safely.

If you supply a substance on its own or in a preparation or mixture you must provide recipients and customers with a safety data sheet.

Depending on which substance you supply and the amount you supply, you may also need to:

  • submit a notification to ECHA
  • get an authorisation for specific uses for that substance if it appears in Annex XIV.

The UK REACH competent authority has produced guidance on substances that require an authorisation.

UK REACH Competent Authority: Substances of very high concern (Adobe PDF - 94 KB)

Annex XVII substances

Annex XVII of REACH contains a list of restricted chemicals with the associated restrictions and concentration limits. More chemicals and restrictions may be added in the future.

Restricted chemicals include:

  • lead carbonates
  • sleadsulphates
  • benzene
  • pentachlorophenol
  • nonylphenol and its ethoxylates
  • cadmium
  • hexachloroethane
  • creosote
  • compounds containing mercury and arsenic.

Annex XVII of REACH is subject to change, you should check it regularly to keep up to date with restrictions on the chemicals you are involved with.

Use the European Union law database and search using the terms 'REACH' with 'Annex XVII' in the simple search window (text search).

European Union: EUR-Lex database

If a chemical is listed in Annex XVII you must not:

  • market or use the chemical for the restrictions outlined
  • market or use any substances, preparations or article containing the chemical for the restrictions outlined
  • allow or cause anyone else to break the rules of a restriction.

Annex XVII chemicals are restricted to protect:

  • workers
  • consumers
  • the environment.

Enforcement of REACH

Different regulators enforce REACH depending on the chemical, your business type and part of the UK you operate in. To check, contact the HSE to find out which regulator you need to speak to.

Health and Safety Executive: REACH helpdesk

UK REACH Competent Authority: Enforcement

Manufacturers, importers and distributors

If you manufacture or import chemical substances into the EU in quantities of one tonne or more per calendar year, you must comply with additional requirements. You must make sure a substance has been pre-registered or registered if it needs to be.

If you manufacture, import or supply chemicals, see our guidance on the REACH Regulation – manufacturing, importing and selling and using chemicals

Chemsec has developed an online resource, the Marketplace,  where businesses can source alternatives to chemicals that have health or environmental impacts. If you produce safer chemicals then you can also present your alternatives to potential customers.

Chemsec: the Marketplace

Further information on complying with REACH

UK REACH competent authority guidance

Health and Safety Executive: REACH

UK REACH Competent Authority: What REACH means for manufacturers (Adobe PDF - 506KB)

UK REACH Competent Authority: What REACH means for EU importers (Adobe PDF - 221KB)

UK REACH Competent Authority: What REACH means for users of chemicals (Adobe PDF - 418KB)

UK REACH Competent Authority: The distributor's role in REACH (Adobe PDF - 96KB)

The HSE operates a UK REACH Competent Authority helpdesk which you can contact directly by email.

UK REACH Competent Authority helpdesk

Reach registration 2018 represents the final deadline for the registration of phase-in substances which are manufactured or imported in quantities greater than 1 tonne per annum.

HSE: REACH Registration 2018

European Chemicals Agency guidance

European Chemicals Agency: Guidance documents

ECHA has set up a helpdesk for queries relating to all aspects of REACH.

European Chemicals Agency: Contact ECHA

Other relevant NetRegs guidance

See our guidance on REACH

Trade associations can help you find alternative chemicals and solutions.

Chemicals industry trade associations

If you use or supply chemical substances you must comply with the REACH (Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and restriction of Chemicals) Regulation.

If you manufacture chemicals or import chemicals from outside the European Union (EU) you will have additional duties under the REACH Regulation.

REACH applies to a wide range of chemical substances and chemicals in preparations or mixtures and articles.

Preparations or mixtures that you may use or supply include:

  • coatings, eg paints, varnishes or enamels
  • pigments or dyes, eg carbon black
  • cleaning products, eg surface degreasing agents containing solvents
  • chemicals used to produce manmade fibres including:
    - monomer substances, eg isoprene, styrene
    - anti-degradants, eg antioxidants or ultraviolet absorbers
    - plasticisers or other modifiers, eg extender oils
    - curing agents, eg sulphur or peroxides
    - catalysts or other process additives or aids, eg fillers, oils, release agents
  • chemicals contained within articles, eg ink in plastic printer cartridges.

REACH also applies to chemical substances contained in finished products or articles, whether you are manufacturing or supplying them within the EU, or importing them from outside the EU.

UK REACH Competent Authority: What REACH means for EU importers (Adobe PDF - 221KB)
UK REACH Competent Authority: REACH guidance on articles (Adobe PDF - 110KB)

Exempt substances

Some chemical substances are partially or completely exempt from REACH. See the UK REACH Competent Authority guidance for further information about exemptions. Be aware that exemptions may change.

UK REACH Competent Authority: REACH - exemptions (Adobe PDF - 123KB)

Chemical substances inventory

You should make an inventory or list of chemical substances that your business uses, supplies, manufactures or imports. This will help you understand your responsibilities, what you need to do and the impact REACH will have on your business activities.

UK REACH Competent Authority: Creating an inventory for downstream users of chemicals including formulators (Adobe PDF - 111KB)

Chemicals users' requirements

You are a chemical user if as a part of your work you:

  • use any chemicals or preparations
  • formulate or blend chemical preparations or mixtures
  • use any chemicals, preparations or mixtures to produce articles.

If you use a chemical substance you must make sure that you:

  • identify and follow all appropriate safety measures identified by the chemical's safety data sheet, if required
  • use the substance within its safe exposure limits
  • comply with any restrictions or conditions of authorisation that have been placed on its use.

UK REACH Competent Authority: What REACH means for users of chemicals (Adobe PDF - 63KB)

Information on chemicals use

You should check that your suppliers register all the ways you use the chemicals they supply. This is to make sure that your supply of chemicals will not be disrupted. This may not be necessary if you only use the chemical in the way your supplier intended.

If you have an unusual use for a substance, you should provide your suppliers with details of how you intend to use the chemical. This will allow them to include this information in their registration.

You can choose not to give your suppliers this information if you feel it will compromise your business. In this case you must carry out your own chemical safety assessment. You will normally have to provide this information to the European Chemicals Agency (ECHA) and any final users of the chemical.

ECHA: Chemical safety assessment and report

ECHA: Guidance in a nutshell - chemical safety assessment (Adobe PDF - 173KB)

Your supplier must not supply you with a substance that has not been pre-registered or registered if the substance needs to be.

Chemsec has developed an online resource, the Marketplace,  where businesses can source alternatives to chemicals that have health or environmental impacts. If you produce safer chemicals then you can also present your alternatives to potential customers.

Chemsec: the Marketplace

Restricted chemicals

REACH places restrictions on the marketing and use of certain chemical substances on their own or in preparations. These include substances that are classified as persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic (PBT) in the environment.

There are two groups of chemicals:

  • substances of very high concern (SVHCs) and Annex XIV (14) substances that require an authorisation for their use
  • Annex XVII (17) substances whose marketing and use is restricted.

A substance can appear in both groups.

Chemicals requiring authorisation

REACH identifies substances with known high risks to human health or the environment as substances of very high concern (SVHCs) and Annex XIV substances. ECHA has produced a proposed candidate list of possible substances of very high concern and a recommended list of substances to be included in Annex XIV.

ECHA: Candidate list of substances of very high concern for authorisation

ECHA: Annex XIV recommendations

If you supply an article containing a substance on the SVHC candidate list or Annex XIV you must give recipients information on the substance and how to use it safely.

If you supply a substance on its own or in a preparation or mixture you must provide recipients and customers with a safety data sheet.

Depending on which substance you supply and the amount you supply, you may also need to:

  • submit a notification to ECHA
  • get an authorisation for specific uses for that substance if it appears in Annex XIV.

The UK REACH competent authority has produced guidance on substances that require an authorisation.

UK REACH Competent Authority: Substances of very high concern (Adobe PDF - 94 KB)

Annex XVII substances

Annex XVII of REACH contains a list of restricted chemicals with the associated restrictions and concentration limits. More chemicals and restrictions may be added in the future.

Restricted chemicals include:

  • lead carbonates
  • sleadsulphates
  • benzene
  • pentachlorophenol
  • nonylphenol and its ethoxylates
  • cadmium
  • hexachloroethane
  • creosote
  • compounds containing mercury and arsenic.

Annex XVII of REACH is subject to change, you should check it regularly to keep up to date with restrictions on the chemicals you are involved with.

Use the European Union law database and search using the terms 'REACH' with 'Annex XVII' in the simple search window (text search).

European Union: EUR-Lex database

If a chemical is listed in Annex XVII you must not:

  • market or use the chemical for the restrictions outlined
  • market or use any substances, preparations or article containing the chemical for the restrictions outlined
  • allow or cause anyone else to break the rules of a restriction.

Annex XVII chemicals are restricted to protect:

  • workers
  • consumers
  • the environment.

Annex XVII also restricts the placing on the market and use of some polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). PAHs are a large group of chemicals. Some PAHs are known to build up in the bodies of plants and animals which can cause harm to human health and the environment.

If you make or supply tyres or retreads you should check that they, and any extender oils you use, don't contain more than the restricted level of PAHs.

Enforcement of REACH

Different regulators enforce REACH depending on the chemical, your business type and part of the UK you operate in. To check, contact the HSE to find out which regulator you need to speak to.

Health and Safety Executive: REACH helpdesk
UK REACH Competent Authority: Enforcement

Manufacturers, importers and distributors

If you manufacture or import chemical substances into the EU in quantities of one tonne or more per calendar year, you must comply with additional requirements. You must make sure a substance has been pre-registered or registered if it needs to be.

If you manufacture, import or supply chemicals, see our guidance on the REACH Regulation – manufacturing, importing, selling and using chemicals

Further information on complying with REACH

UK REACH competent authority guidance

Health and Safety Executive: REACH

UK REACH Competent Authority: What REACH means for manufacturers (Adobe PDF - 506KB)

UK REACH Competent Authority: What REACH means for EU importers (Adobe PDF - 221KB)

UK REACH Competent Authority: What REACH means for users of chemicals (Adobe PDF - 418KB)

UK REACH Competent Authority: The distributor's role in REACH (Adobe PDF - 96KB)

The HSE operates a UK REACH Competent Authority helpdesk which you can contact directly by email.

UK REACH Competent Authority helpdesk

European Chemicals Agency guidance

European Chemicals Agency: Guidance documents

ECHA has set up a helpdesk for queries relating to all aspects of REACH.

European Chemicals Agency: Contact ECHA

Other relevant NetRegs guidance

See our guidance on REACH

Trade associations can help you find alternative chemicals and solutions.

Chemicals industry trade associations

Organic or manufactured nitrogen fertilisers that you use on your land can pollute surface and ground waters.

What you must do

Store and apply fertilisers safely

Make sure you comply with regulations on storing and applying fertilisers by checking our guidance on chemical and man-made fertilisers

Check if you need to comply with spreading limits for manure and fertilisers

If your land is in a nitrate vulnerable zone (NVZ) Scotland you may have to comply with limits on the amount of livestock manure and manufactured fertilisers you can spread on your land. These limits apply to all land in Northern Ireland.

Read our guidance on NVZs for more information and to find out if you are in an NVZ.

Northern Ireland: Nitrate Action Programme and Phosphorus Regulations

Scotland: Nitrate Vulnerable Zones (NVZs)

Further information on using fertilisers

DAERA: Summary of the Nitrates action programme and Phosphorus regulations 2015 - 2018

Scottish Government: Prevention of Environmental Pollution from Agricultural Activity (PEPFAA Code) 2005 (Scotland)

For information on wood working as part of secondary school courses, see our Design and Technology/Craft and Design guidance.

Design and technology/craft and design materials

Further or higher education establishments which run courses teaching the skills associated with processes used in industry and business can find useful guidance in the NetRegs guidance for businesses that work with wood.

Wood and timber products

Whats new on NetRegs

  • SEPA unveils new waste to resources framework

    A new framework for tackling waste has been unveiled by the Scottish Environment Protection Agency (SEPA), focussing on how SEPA will support a circular economy in Scotland.
    One Planet Prosperity – A Waste to Resources Framework

  • Waste – Duty of Care Roles and Responsibilities

    The Northern Ireland Environment Agency has published a short guide to the duty of care responsibilities including advice and information for waste producers, carriers and those accepting, storing and treating waste.

    https://www.daera-ni.gov.uk/publications/waste-duty-care-responsibilities

  • Please let us know your thoughts on our new website

    What do you think about our new and improved website. We want your feedback on what you like, what you don’t like and ways we can continue to improve the website. Follow the link to complete the very short survey: NetRegs website – User feedback

  • NEW guidance on Environmental Management Systems

    We have recently updated and improved our guidance on Environmental Management Systems (EMS). You can find the guidance via the Environmental Topics tab or alternatively select the following link Environmental Management Systems (EMS).

  • Consultation on proposed changes to the packaging recycling business targets

    See NI Future legislation or Scotland Future legislation for details of the Consultation

  • NetRegs SMEnvironment survey 2016

    NetRegs has carried out a survey of environmental awareness among SMEs. There are separate reports for Scotland and Northern Ireland.

  • NIEA Guidance - Greenfield Excavated Matrials in Construction

    NIEA and the CEF have developed a Regulatory Position to promote Sustainable re-use of natural excavated material from Greenfield sites.

    NIEA: Guidance on the Regulation of Greenfield Excavated Materials in Construction and Development

  • New GPP 2 Above Ground Oil Storage

    The replacements for the PPGs are being developed. Now available GPP 2 Above Ground Oil Storage

  • SEPA Consultation on an Intergated Authorisation Framework

    SEPA is asking for your views on the proposals for integrated authorisations.

    Consultation documents

  • GPP 24 Stables, Kennels and Catteries

    NEW GPP 24 now available: Stables, Kennels and Catteries

  • ENDS Award Shortlist

    NetRegs has been nominated for 3 ENDS Awards with the result being revealed on the 4th of May.

  • NetRegs wins an ENDS Environmental Impact Award

    Knowledge development category winners, see the END Awards

  • EIA (Agriculture) Regulations for Northern Ireland

    Any person intending to alter the use or management of areas of uncultivated or semi-natural land must obtain prior approval from the Department of Agriculture, Environment and Rural Affairs (DAERA).

    Read more on the DAERA website

NetRegs on NetRegs on youTube

View our latest videos & subscribe to our channel.

NetRegs Update Newsletter

Free monthly email newsletter with environmental updates for Northern Ireland and Scotland

Sign up for free today!

Permits

NIEA - Apply online

SEPA - Application forms