Environmental guidance for your business in Northern Ireland & Scotland

Chemical storage

If your business stores any type of chemicals you must take all necessary steps to prevent pollution. Chemicals you may store include cleaning products, pesticides, glues, dyes and solvents.

The chemicals you store and use could cause pollution if they spill onto land, enter surface waters or groundwater or are released into the air. Many chemical substances are also harmful to human health. If you cause or allow pollution to occur you may be prosecuted and fined. Your business could suffer from lost contracts, production downtime, clean up costs and increased insurance premiums.

This guide explains how you can store chemicals safely to minimise the risk of pollution and how you can store chemicals safely in vehicles, for example if you need to transport chemicals for your work.

 

 

Additional resources

       

The REACH (Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and restriction of Chemicals) requirements affect businesses that manufacture, import, distribute, sell, store or use chemical substances, preparations or articles.

Using chemicals

REACH will probably not affect you if you use common chemical products for their intended purposes, eg paints, glues, cleaning materials and solvents.

If you use a chemical in a way that may not be expected, you should contact your supplier. They will need to consider registering the chemical's use. If you do not want your supplier to know what you are using a chemical for (eg if you are using it in a new or innovative way) you must let the European Chemicals Agency (ECHA) know about the use.

The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) has produced guidance on what users of chemicals must do.

HSE: What REACH means for users of chemicals (PDF 64K)

It is a good idea to produce an inventory of all the chemicals you use and store on your site, and the quantities that you have. The HSE has produced guidance on how to create a chemical inventory.

HSE: Creating an inventory for downstream users (PDF, 97K)

Information about chemicals

REACH makes sure that chemical users receive information about how to store, use and dispose of chemicals.

You may receive a safety data sheet (SDS) with some of the chemicals you use. If you receive a chemical without an SDS, contact your supplier to find out whether or not they have to provide one.

You should follow the instructions on the SDS to ensure you use your chemicals safely.

Registering chemicals

If you manufacture chemicals or import chemicals from outside the European Union, you must register them with the ECHA. You will also need to provide information about how to use, store and handle chemicals safely.

REACH Regulations

Further information

HSE: REACH bitesize advice

HSENI: REACH information

HSE: REACH information

European Chemicals Agency: REACH information

When you are planning chemical storage areas, you should carefully consider how you store, handle and take delivery of chemicals at your site.

What you must do

Follow safety data sheet instructions

When you receive any chemical it may be supplied with a safety data sheet (SDS). The SDS contains information about the chemical, including how to store, use and dispose of it safely. The SDS may also recommend the best methods and materials to use for cleaning up a spill. If you receive a chemical without an SDS, contact your supplier to find out whether or not they have to provide one.

For more information about SDSs, see the page in this guide on chemical labelling and information.

Comply with health and safety legislation

If you store hazardous chemicals you must comply with the Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (COSHH) Regulations to protect the health of your staff. Check the SDS to see if the substances you use are hazardous.

The Health and Safety Executive Northern Ireland (HSENI) and Healthy Working Lives in Scotland have produced guidance on the COSHH Regulations.

HSENI: COSHH

Scotland: Healthy Working Lives: COSHH and hazardous substances

Good practice

Locate your storage areas to minimise the risks of damage to the environment, and the health and safety of your employees and the public. Ensure that your storage area is located so if chemicals leak or spill, you will not pollute air, land, surface waters or groundwater.

Make sure your storage area is:

  • secure - avoid sites close to a boundary fence
  • away from heavy plant or where vehicles move around to minimise the risk of collision or damage to storage systems and pipework from vibrations
  • not likely to flood or, if this is not possible, above the height that any flood water is likely to reach
  • clearly signposted, with a clear boundary.

You should store chemicals safely to protect groundwater. It is important to remember that groundwater may be used for drinking water supplies. To find out if you are in an area where groundwater is particularly vulnerable, you should contact your environmental regulator.

Contact your environmental regulator

Delivery and handling of chemicals on your site can cause pollution. For example, forklifts can damage chemical containers and chemical bottles may break and leak.
You should:

  • Supervise deliveries of chemicals and fuels at all times.
  • Label all tanks and containers clearly with their contents and storage capacity - check levels before deliveries to prevent overfilling and spills.
  • Locate delivery areas to minimise the vehicle movements on your site. If possible, have a one-way system to avoid congestion, especially if you have frequent deliveries.
  • Mark out delivery areas clearly. If possible, put a roof over the delivery area.
  • Have an up-to-date drainage plan of your site. This will help you identify where any spills may end up.
  • Ensure drains from delivery areas connect to the foul sewer. If this isn't possible, isolate run-off from the surface water drainage system, either by catch-pits or sumps with isolating valves. Your delivery area should have an impermeable surface.
  • Check that delivery pipes have automatic cut-off valves to prevent overfilling tanks, intermediate bulk containers or mobile bowsers.
  • Keep a spill kit close to delivery areas, and make sure that your staff know how to use it. See the page in this guideline: Avoiding and dealing with chemical spills.

It is good practice to follow the pollution prevention guidelines (PPGs) to help you avoid causing pollution.

Pollution Prevention Guidelines (PPGs)

You can use the NetRegs e-learning tools to get a good overview of key issues. These tools are free to use and cover the essential points of each topic. They might be useful as a refresher course, or to make sure that staff have a good understanding of their environmental responsibilities.

  • Preventing pollution – a general guide
  • Duty of care
  • Sinks, drains and sewers
  • WEEE
  • Generating renewable energy

All are available at: NetRegs e-learning tools

Further information

HSENI: COSHH

Scotland: Healthy Working Lives: COSHH and hazardous substances

PPG 1 General guide to the prevention of pollution (Adobe PDF – 95.8KB)

PPG 26 Drums and intermediate bulk containers (IBC) (Adobe PDF - 351KB)

PPG 27 Installation, decommissioning and removal of underground storage tanks (Adobe PDF – 96KB)

CIRIA 736 - Containment systems for the prevention of pollution. Secondary, tertiary and other measures for industrial and commercial premises.

If you store chemicals in tanks, mobile bowsers, intermediate bulk containers (IBCs) or drums, you must take precautions to avoid causing pollution.

Store oil and chemicals safely

You must store any hazardous chemical in a suitable container that is:

  • sealed securely to prevent spills
  • resistant to the effects of the substance
  • strong enough to be handled.

You can check the chemical's safety data sheet(SDS) to see if it is hazardous. The SDS contains information about the chemical, including details of how to store, use and dispose of it safely. See the page in this guideline: Chemical labelling and information.

Separate all incompatible chemicals. If you store incompatible chemicals together and there is a leak or spill, it could cause a violent reaction. A chemical's SDS will tell you which chemicals it is incompatible with.

To prevent accidents, you should store flammable chemicals in a fire-proof steel cabinet or drum store. If you store large quantities of flammables, you may need to keep them in a designated room.

If you store any kind of oil on your premises, you may need to comply with the Oil Storage Regulations. Even if the regulations do not apply, you should consider meeting the requirements to help prevent water pollution and avoid prosecution. See our guideline: Storing oil.

Avoid major accidents

The Control of Major Accident Hazards (COMAH) Regulations may affect your business if you:

  • store large quantities of chemicals
  • store fuels, including gas
  • have a large warehouse or distribution facility
  • store explosives.

For more information, see our guideline: Control of major accident hazards (COMAH).

Use bunds and secondary containment systems

Store all chemicals in an area where you can contain spills. See the page in this guideline: Secondary containment systems for bulk chemical stores

Maintain storage tanks, IBCs and underground tanks

You should:

  • ensure that your containers are in good condition and are strong enough to prevent bursts or leaks in normal use
  • inspect storage containers at least once a week - if you find damaged containers, repair or replace them immediately
  • use IBCs instead of drums wherever possible - they are easier and safer to handle and use, and less likely to leak than drums.

PPG 26 Drums and intermediate bulk containers (IBC) (Adobe PDF - 351KB)

Below-ground tanks and pipework are difficult to inspect and leaks may not be immediately obvious. To prevent leaks, you should:

  • fit a leak detection system
  • not install underground tanks below the water table
  • use flexible piping if you run pipes below a source of vibration - vibrations from heavy machinery can damage underground pipes
  • test all pipework for leaks when it is first installed.

Prevent vandalism of chemical stores

You are responsible for all chemicals and oil on your site. You can be prosecuted for a pollution incident that starts on your site even if it was caused by vandals.

If you store chemicals outside you should use lockable storage units and keep chemicals locked away when they are not in use.

Further information

PPG 1 General guide to the prevention of pollution (Adobe PDF – 95.8KB)

PPG 2 Above ground oil storage tanks (Adobe PDF - 276KB)

PPG 26 Drums and intermediate bulk containers (IBC) (Adobe PDF - 351KB)

PPG 27 Installation, decommissioning and removal of underground storage tanks (Adobe PDF – 96KB)

Store all chemicals in an area where you can contain spills. This should be within a secondary containment system (SCS) such as:

  • an impermeable bunded area
  • on a bunded pallet or spill pallet
  • in a sump pallet
  • a bunded storage unit
  • a bunded drum store
  • a storage cabinet with an integral sump.

Use a bunded trolley or mobile sump pallet for moving drums and IBCs around your site. Before you move drums or IBCs, ensure that they are properly secured on the trolley or pallet and will not fall off.

Your bund and any bunded pallets should be able to contain at least 110 per cent of the volume of the largest tank or 25 per cent of the total volume you are likely to store, whichever is greater.

Ensure that your pallets and bunds are made of a suitable material for the chemical you are storing. For example, you should not use a polyethylene bund to store corrosive chemicals.

Dispose of water from bunds correctly

If rainwater collects in a bund, it will reduce its holding capacity. Put a roof over the bunded area to prevent this if possible.

You must comply with your duty of care when you dispose of water that collects in bunds.

Duty of care: your waste responsibilities

You must check if you need a discharge consent or groundwater authorisation to allow rainwater from bunds to enter surface waters or groundwater.

You must not discharge rainwater that collects in bunds to drains that discharge to surface waters or groundwater, unless you have permission from the Northern Ireland Environment Agency or Scottish Environment Protection Agency. You may be able to discharge uncontaminated rainwater but you should contact your environmental regulator if you are unsure about what you can discharge.

Contact your environmental regulator

You must not discharge rainwater that collects in bunds to drains that discharge to foul sewer, unless you have permission from your water and sewerage company. It is against the law to discharge anything into the sewer that could harm sewers or interfere with the treatment or disposal of sewer contents.

Trade effluent: managing liquid wastes

Preventing water pollution

Water that collects in the bund may be contaminated. You must dispose of contaminated water as hazardous waste, unless you have and comply with a discharge consent or groundwater authorisation for a discharge.

Hazardous/special waste

Secondary containment for small chemical stores

You may want to use different measures for small chemical stores, such as a drip tray or bunded cabinet. See the page in this guideline on small-scale chemical storage - cabinets, shelves and vehicles.

Further information

PPG 2 Above ground oil storage tanks (Adobe PDF - 276KB)

PPG 26 Drums and intermediate bulk containers (IBC) (Adobe PDF - 351KB)

CIRIA 736 - Containment systems for the prevention of pollution. Secondary, tertiary and other measures for industrial and commercial premises.

There are legal requirements if you store chemicals in small-scale stores, such as in:

  • chemical cabinets, cupboards or on shelves, eg in a laboratory or workshop
  • a vehicle, eg if you carry paints, pesticides or cleaning chemicals for your work.

Store chemicals safely

You must store any hazardous chemical in a suitable container that is:

  • sealed securely to prevent spills
  • resistant to the effects of the substance
  • strong enough to cope with handling.

You can check the chemical's safety data sheet (SDS) to see if it is hazardous. The SDS contains information about the chemical, including details of how to store, use and dispose of it safely. See the page in this guideline: Chemical labelling and information.

Separate all incompatible chemicals. If you store incompatible chemicals together and there is a leak or spill, it could cause a violent reaction. A chemical's SDS will tell you which chemicals it shouldn't be mixed with.

If you store pest control products on your site, make sure you store them safely to avoid causing pollution.

Pesticides and biocides

If you store chemicals in your work vehicle, lock the vehicle whenever you leave it. Don't leave chemicals on display.

Keep your chemicals in a deep drip tray in your vehicle. Alternatively, ensure that your chemicals are in double-skinned containers, and that you keep containers tightly shut.

Secure chemical containers so that they cannot move about when you are driving.

Use secure shelving and secondary containment

Use bunded shelving to catch any spills. Alternatively, keep chemicals on shelves within drip trays.

You should secure all shelving and storage units to the floor or wall to prevent them toppling over.

Store all bottles, vials and other chemical containers:

  • within a drip tray
  • in a bunded cabinet
  • in a bunded chemical store
  • on bunded shelving.

The bund or drip tray should be big enough to contain any spills.

Make sure that your drip trays or bunded shelves are made of a suitable material for the chemical you are storing. For example, you may not be able to use a polyethylene container to store corrosive chemicals.

Keep double-wrapped or bagged chemicals in trays. Keep chemicals from the same batch together in the same storage tray.

Store flammable chemicals safely

Store flammable chemicals in a fire-proof steel cabinet or chemical storage cupboard. If you store lots of flammables, you may need to keep them in a designated room.

Common flammable substances include:

  • cleaning fluids
  • adhesives
  • thinners
  • aerosols
  • paints.

Keep information and implement safety precautions

You should:

  • keep an inventory of the chemicals you have on site, and details of when you received them and when you should dispose of them if you don't use them up
  • avoid storing chemicals above eye-height, or on top of cupboards or cabinets - use safety steps if you need to reach chemicals stored at height
  • wear appropriate protective clothing when you are dealing with chemicals, such as gloves, goggles or a face mask –
  • avoid storing chemicals directly on the floor, even temporarily.

Prevent vandalism of chemical stores

You are responsible for all chemicals on your site. You can be prosecuted for a pollution incident that originates on your site even if it was caused by vandals.

Use lockable storage units and keep chemicals locked away if possible when they are not in use.

Further information

HSE: Chemical manufacture and storage for small companies

You should store heat-sensitive chemicals in a refrigerator or freezer. You may also need to use these chemicals in a temperature-controlled area. Heat-sensitive chemicals include:

  • high concentrations of hydrogen peroxide
  • peroxyacetate
  • some epoxies
  • vaccines
  • some medicines
  • some biological chemicals, such as enzymes, proteins and DNA.

When you receive any chemical it may be supplied with a safety data sheet (SDS). The SDS contains information about the chemical, including details of how to store it safely. The SDS will tell you if you need to store the chemical at a specific temperature. If you receive a chemical without an SDS, contact your supplier to find out whether they have to provide one.

Store heat-sensitive chemicals safely

You should:

  • only use refrigerators and freezers that are designed specifically for storing chemicals
  • avoid storing flammable chemicals in refrigerators or freezers, unless they are spark-proof
  • store chemical bottles in drip trays or on bunded shelves.

For walk-in refrigerated units, store drums and intermediate bulk containers on bunded pallets or sump pallets.

Prevent vandalism of chemical fridges and freezers

You are responsible for all chemicals on your site. You can be prosecuted for a pollution incident that originates on your site even if it was caused by vandalism.

Keep chemicals in lockable fridges and freezers. If your storage unit is outside, keep it locked when you're not using it.

Buy an efficient fridge or freezer

Ensure that the fridge or freezer has an alarm to alert you if the temperature rises too high.

Choose the most energy efficient fridges and freezers. You can find guidance on energy labelling on the Directgov website.

Directgov: Energy labelling

Choose the right size of fridge or freezer to meet your needs. It is inefficient to run a large fridge if you only have to store a small amount of chemicals. You can get small bench-top or under-bench units as well as larger free-standing fridges and freezers.
Switch off fridges and freezers when you're not using them.

Dispose of fridges and freezers correctly

You must use a specialist disposal business for your old fridges and freezers. They may contain hazardous chemicals such as ammonia or ozone-depleting substances.

Find your nearest waste site

When you receive any chemical it may be supplied with a safety data sheet (SDS). This is sometimes also referred to as a material safety data sheet. The SDS contains information about the chemical including:

  • how to store and use it safely
  • chemicals it is incompatible with, eg that you should not store it with
  • how to dispose of it safely.

When you receive a chemical, check the SDS to find out how to store it safely. If you receive a chemical without an SDS, contact your supplier to find out whether or not they have to provide one.

Understand hazard labels

If the chemical you receive is hazardous it should have a hazard label on it. These labels contain chemical hazard warning symbols that tell you what the risks of a chemical or product are. The hazard label will tell you whether a chemical is:

  • explosive
  • an oxidising agent
  • flammable
  • toxic
  • harmful
  • an irritant
  • corrosive
  • dangerous to the environment.

You should ensure that you and your staff are familiar with the hazard labels. You can download guidance on how to find out if chemicals are dangerous from the Health & Safety Executive (HSE) website.

HSE: Labelling and packaging

HSE: Read the label

Mark vehicles that transport chemicals

If you carry chemicals in your vehicle, you must label your vehicle with the appropriate hazard warning label for those chemicals.

If you transport dangerous chemicals you must meet further requirements for packaging, labelling and documentation.

Northern Ireland: HSENI: Carriage of dangerous goods

Scotland: HSE: Carriage of dangerous goods

Manufacturing and supplying chemicals

If you manufacture or supply chemicals you may need to provide an SDS to your customers. This is now a requirement of the REACH (Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals) Regulation. You can download guidance on REACH and SDSs from the HSE website.

HSE: Reach and Safety Data Sheets (PDF, 158K)

If you manufacture or supply chemicals or chemical products you must also package and label them with the appropriate hazard labels.You can find hazard warning label information on the HSE website.

HSE: Labelling and Packaging

Further information

HSE: Read the label (PDF, 954K)

Northern Ireland: HSENI: carriage of dangerous goods

Scotland: HSE: Carriage of dangerous goods

HSE: CLP regulations

You should manage your site carefully to reduce the risk of chemical spills. If you have a chemical spill on your site, it is important that your staff know how to deal with it. If you cause pollution you could be prosecuted and fined.

You should report pollution incidents as soon as they happen by calling the UK wide Pollution Hotline on Tel 0800 80 70 60.

Plan for pollution incidents

You should have a pollution incident response procedure in place for dealing with spills. Make sure that your staff are familiar with the procedure and know how to implement it. If you store lots of chemicals or have a chemical warehouse, you may need to install a spill alarm so that you can evacuate the building when there is a spill.

PPG 21: Pollution incident response planning

If you store large quantities of dangerous substances, then you may need a major accident prevention policy under the Control of Major Accident Hazards (COMAH) Regulations.

COMAH

Prevent pollution from spills

Ensure that you have absorbent materials - such as sand and other containment equipment - suitable for the type and quantity of chemicals you store and use on your site. Keep them close to where you might need them, particularly in delivery areas. Make sure that your staff know where they are and how to use them. You can buy spill kits containing all the appropriate spill equipment for the chemicals you store.

Try to prevent liquid spills from entering drains, surface waters or groundwater. For example, use earth to block the flow of large spills, or use sand or a commercial spill kit to soak them up.

You should never hose down a spill, as you could cause a much worse pollution incident.

If you store chemicals in a vehicle, you should also carry a spill kit suitable for the quantity and type of chemicals you have.

PPG 22 Incident response – dealing with spills (Adobe PDF - 548KB)

Dispose of chemical leaks and spills safely

You must ensure that you clean up chemical leaks and spills correctly. You must dispose of waste chemicals and used spill equipment correctly and get it treated by an appropriate waste plant. You will need to deal with waste chemicals and materials contaminated with chemicals as hazardous waste.

You can only dispose of hazardous waste at a landfill site after it has been treated. Certain types of waste are banned from landfill, such as any chemicals that are:

  • explosive
  • corrosive
  • flammable
  • oxidising
  • infectious.

Hazardous/special waste

Safety showers

If you have safety showers on your site, ensure that you dispose of the water from the showers safely, as it may be contaminated. You can dispose of this water to the foul sewer, but you will need permission from your water company first.

Northern Ireland: Find water and sewerage operators on Water UK website

Scotland: Scotland on Tap

Further information

PPG 18 Managing fire water and major spillages (Adobe PDF – 132 KB)

PPG 21 Pollution incident response planning (Adobe PDF – 318KB)

PPG 22 Incident response – dealing with spills (Adobe PDF - 548KB)

You should manage your chemicals carefully to reduce the amount of chemical waste you produce. Reuse or recycle chemicals and chemical containers wherever possible.

Dispose of your chemical waste responsibly

You must check that anyone that you pass your waste to is authorised to take it. If you don't check and they dispose of it illegally, you could be held responsible. This is known as your duty of care.

Duty of care – your waste responsibilities

Find your nearest waste site

If you produce waste that may be harmful to human health or the environment, you will need to deal with it as hazardous/special waste.

Hazardous/special waste

Dispose of chemical containers

Your supplier may take back chemical containers to reuse or recycle them. You may have to triple rinse containers first. You must have permission from your water company before you dispose of rinse water to the foul sewer. If you rinse out pesticide containers you can add the rinse water to the spray tank.

Northern Ireland: Find water and sewerage operators on Water UK website

Scotland: Scotland on Tap

If the container that you are rinsing out contained a hazardous chemical, the rinse water is also likely to be hazardous and you must dispose of it as hazardous waste.

Recover chemicals from waste

If you recover any chemicals from waste, the REACH (Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals) Regulation is likely to apply to you.

Recovering chemical substances from waste

Reduce, reuse and recycle chemical waste

Reduce your chemical waste - only buy the amount of a chemical that you need. Use an inventory to help you manage your chemicals.

Keep an inventory of the chemicals you have on site. This should include details of when you received them and when you should dispose of them if you don't use them up. This will help you to avoid having more chemicals than you need.

Reuse or recycle packaging from chemical deliveries, such as:

  • cardboard
  • wooden pallets
  • polystyrene loose fill packaging
  • vermiculite
  • plastic bags.

Check with your supplier to see if you can reuse your chemical containers - they may be able to refill containers with the same chemical. Some waste recovery businesses offer cleaning services so that you can reuse chemical containers.

You may be able to recycle waste metal or plastic drums if they contained non-hazardous chemicals. Ask your waste site if they offer a recycling service.

Store and transport waste chemicals safely

Store and transport all waste chemicals in suitable, sealed containers such as drums.
Store and transport waste chemical containers and other packaging in covered containers, such as drums, cages or covered skips.

If you transport dangerous waste you must meet further requirements for packaging, labelling and documentation.

Northern Ireland: HSENI – Carriage of dangerous goods

Scotland: HSE - Carriage of dangerous goods

Further information

Find your nearest waste site

This page provides links to the full text of key pieces of environmental legislation relating to chemical storage. The websites hosting the legislation may list amendments separately.

If you are setting up an environmental management system (EMS) for your business, you can use this list to start compiling your legal register. Your legal adviser or environmental consultant will be able to tell you if other environmental legislation applies to your specific business.
Environmental management systems and environmental reports

Northern Ireland

European Communities (EC) Regulation on the registration, evaluation, authorisation and restriction of chemicals (REACH) 1907/2006 (As amended) Requires manufacturers and importers of chemicals to evaluate and manage risks arising from their use, and prove that chemicals placed on the market are safe.

REACH Enforcement Regulations SI2008/2852 Implement the enforcement regime for REACH, by allocating the authorities the powers they need. Set the offences and penalties for contraventions of REACH requirements.

EU Regulation on the export and import of hazardous chemicals 2012/649 Introduces more stringent provisions on the import and export of dangerous chemicals in order to give greater protection to human health and the environment.

Control of Major Accident Hazards Regulations (Northern Ireland) 2015/325 These regulations require businesses to take steps to control the major accident hazards involving dangerous substances. They apply to establishments where dangerous substances are present in quantities at or above the threshold levels set out in Schedule 1 of the regulations

Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (COSHH) Regulations (Northern Ireland) SR 2003/34. Requires employers to assess risks, prevent or control exposure to hazardous substances and monitor employees' exposure.

Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (Amendment) Regulations (Northern Ireland) SR 2003/288. Amends 2003/34 to add a definition of mutagen and include 17 polychlorodibenzodioxins and polychlorodibenzofurans to the list of carcinogens.

Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (Amendment) Regulations (Northern Ireland) SR 2005/165. Amends 2003/288 with minor changes.

Chemicals (Hazard Information and Packaging for Supply) Regulations (Northern Ireland) SR2009/238 Sets out the new system for the classification, labelling and packaging of hazardous chemicals.

Scotland

European Communities (EC) Regulation on the registration, evaluation, authorisation and restriction of chemicals (REACH) 1907/2006. (As amended) Requires manufacturers and importers of chemicals to evaluate and manage risks arising from their use, and prove that chemicals placed on the market are safe.

REACH Enforcement Regulations SI2008/2852 Implement the enforcement regime for REACH, by allocating the authorities the powers they need. Set the offences and penalties for contraventions of REACH requirements.

EU Regulation on the export and import of hazardous chemicals 2012/649 Introduces more stringent provisions on the import and export of dangerous chemicals in order to give greater protection to human health and the environment.

Control of Major Accident Hazards (COMAH) Regulations SI 1999/743. Places greater responsibility on users of dangerous substances to prevent accidents and limit their effect on people and the environment. Users must have an accident prevention policy and an on-site emergency plan.

Control of Major Accident Hazards (Amendment) Regulations SI 2005/1088. Amends 1999/743 with changes to requirements for accident plans and policies.

Control of Major Accident Hazards (Amendment) Regulations SI 2008/1087. Amends 1999/743 to correct errors.

The Control of Major Accident Hazards Regulations 2015 These regulations require businesses to take steps to control the major accident hazards involving dangerous substances. They apply to establishments where dangerous substances are present in quantities at or above the threshold levels set out in Schedule 1 of the regulations

Chemicals (Hazard Information and Packaging for Supply) Regulations SI 2009/716 Sets out a new system for the classification, labelling and packaging of hazardous chemicals.

Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (COSHH) Regulations SI 2002/2677 Requires employers to assess the risks of, and prevent or control exposure to hazardous substances and monitor employees' exposure. Also places duties on employees concerning their own protection from such exposure.

Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (Amendment) Regulations SI 2003/978. Amends 2002/2677 by adding new definitions and additional hazardous substances.

Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (Amendment) Regulations SI 2004/3386. Amends 2002/2677 by introducing new exposure limits and amending the duty to review control measures.

Further information

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Environmental legislation on NetRegs

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