Environmental guidance for your business in Northern Ireland & Scotland

Batteries regulations

There are two main pieces of environmental legislation that relate specifically to batteries. These set out restrictions on the use of mercury and cadmium in new batteries, labelling requirements and removability of waste batteries from appliances. They also establish a framework for the separate collection, treatment and recycling of batteries when they become waste.

You must comply with the batteries regulations if your business:

  • manufactures batteries or equipment containing batteries
  • imports batteries into the UK for sale
  • distributes and supplies batteries
  • is involved in the separate collection, treatment, recycling or export of waste batteries for recycling.

This guideline identifies the different businesses that the regulations apply to, and the requirements under the regulations that you must comply with. It covers information on labelling, substance restrictions, removability requirements and the disposal of waste batteries and accumulators.

Additional resources

   

Different types of business are affected by batteries regulations including:

  • producers, i.e. anyone placing batteries on the UK market on a professional basis - this can be loose or within electrical and electronic equipment
  • distributors and retailers
  • recyclers and exporters of waste batteries.

Battery producers

You are a producer of batteries if you manufacture or import batteries or appliances containing batteries and place them on the UK market for the first time. Examples of producers include:

  • businesses with a UK presence that import batteries into the UK and then sell them wholesale in the UK
  • businesses with a UK presence that manufacture or import products which include batteries (such as laptop computers) into the UK and then sell them in the UK
  • UK battery manufacturers that sell to the general public or retailers.

Examples of businesses that aren't producers include those that:

  • import batteries into the UK and then sell them overseas without placing any on the UK market
  • buy batteries wholesale from another business that has already placed the batteries on the UK market.

For information on how to comply with producer obligations, see the pages in this guide on Industrial and automotive battery producer responsibilities and Portable battery producer responsibilities.

Battery distributors and retailers

The regulations place obligations on distributors, ie those supplying portable batteries on a professional basis to end users. If you supply 32 kilograms or more of portable batteries to end users per year, you must comply with the distributor requirements. This includes retailers that supply batteries to consumers and/or businesses. If you only supply batteries contained within equipment - rather than separate batteries - you do not have to take back waste batteries from end users.

Examples of distributors include:

  • a retailer that sells them to end users - whether a business or the general public
  • wholesalers that supply both to end users and retail outlets.

'Supply' includes selling, providing and/or making available portable batteries to end users.

If you are unsure whether you supply 32 kilograms or more of batteries you can use an online battery weight calculator on the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA) website.

DEFRA: Battery calculator

For more information, see the page in this guideline on Portable battery distributor and retailer responsibilities.

Be aware that it is possible for you to be both a producer and a distributor.

Battery users

Battery users have no obligations under the batteries regulations. However, they should dispose of their waste batteries in an environmentally sound way. For example, the disposal of whole, untreated industrial and automotive batteries in landfill or by incineration is banned. See the page in this guide on How end users can recycle waste batteries.

Treating, recycling or exporting waste batteries

If you are involved in the treatment, recycling or export of waste batteries for recycling you must comply with a number of obligations. For more information, see the pages in this guide on Treating or recycling waste batteries and Exporting waste batteries.

Further information

The Department of Business Innovation and Skills (BIS) has produced guidance on the regulations.

GOV.UK: Producer responsibilities – materials, labelling, design and enforcement

GOV.UK: Guidance for battery suppliers and retailers

Waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) Regulations

ROHS Regulations

Hazardous/special waste

Battery regulations apply to both single-use batteries (also known as primary batteries) and rechargeable batteries (known as secondary batteries or accumulators). A battery is defined as any source of electrical energy generated by direct conversion of chemical energy and consisting of one or more battery cells. However, batteries used for specific military purposes or in equipment designed to be sent into space are outside the scope of the regulations.

Batteries are divided into three categories:

  • portable
  • industrial
  • automotive.

Your business must comply with different requirements depending on the type of batteries it places on the market.

Portable batteries

Portable batteries are batteries or battery packs that are:

  • sealed
  • hand carried without difficulty (weigh 4kg or less)
  • neither an industrial or automotive battery.

Examples of portable batteries include:

  • AA or AAA batteries that might be used to power the remote control for a television
  • batteries used in mobile phones, portable MP3 players or laptop computers
  • button cells found on a PC motherboard or in a wristwatch.

For information on responsibilities for producers of portable batteries, see the page in this guide on Portable battery producer responsibilities.

For information on responsibilities for distributors of portable batteries, see the page in this guide on Portable battery distributor and retailer responsibilities

Industrial and automotive batteries

Industrial batteries are batteries or battery packs of any size that are:

  • designed exclusively for professional or industrial uses
  • used as a source of power for propulsion in electric vehicles
  • unsealed but are not automotive batteries
  • sealed but are not portable batteries.

Examples of industrial batteries include those designed for use:

  • in barcode readers and payment card readers in shops
  • in professional video equipment and professional studios
  • as a source of power and propulsion to drive the motor in forklift trucks, golf buggies and mobility buggies
  • in lighthouses.

Automotive batteries are used in vehicles such as cars, vans, lorries, buses and other types of road transport for starting the engine, and lighting.

The majority of automotive batteries are traditional 12-Volt lead-acid batteries that have been used in cars, vans or trucks for many decades. They do not include batteries used in car key fobs or power propulsion for electric vehicles. A hybrid vehicle, for example, is likely to have two batteries - an automotive battery for ignition and an industrial battery for propulsion.

For information on obligations that apply to producers of industrial and automotive batteries, see the page in this guide on Industrial and automotive battery producer responsibilities

If you manufacture or import batteries with the intention of placing them on the market, you must meet certain requirements that restrict the use of cadmium and mercury and set out how batteries should be labelled.

What you must do

Substance restrictions

If you place batteries on the market you must ensure that they comply with the substance restrictions for cadmium and mercury. You must not place on the market:

  • any battery that contains more than 0.0005 per cent (5 parts per million) of mercury by weight.
  • any portable battery that contains more than 0.002 per cent of cadmium by weight - this does not apply to portable batteries intended for use in emergency and alarm systems including emergency lighting, medical equipment or cordless power tools. The exemption for power tools ended on 1 January 2017.

Capacity labelling

After 30 May 2012, if you place on the market either:

  • Portable secondary (rechargeable)
  • Automotive batteries and accumulators

you must include a label indicating the capacity of the battery or accumulator. This must be done in a visible, legible and inedible form and comply with the requirements of the Capacity Labelling Regulation (EU) No 1103/2010.

It does not apply to batteries and accumulators that are incorporated, or are designed to be incorporated, into appliances and are not intended to be removed by the end user.

Using the crossed out wheeled bin symbol

If you place batteries on the market you must label them with a crossed out wheeled bin symbol, which tells users that they should be recycled rather than thrown in a bin and sent to landfill. If the batteries are too small to be labelled, you must print the symbol on the packaging. The regulations set out specific dimensions for the marking of batteries and packaging with the symbol.

File:WEEE symbol vectors.svg

Using appropriate chemical symbols

If you place batteries on the market you must label them with the appropriate chemical symbol or symbols beneath the crossed out wheeled bin symbol:

  • any button cell containing more than 0.0005 per cent of mercury by weight must be marked with the chemical symbol 'Hg' below the crossed out wheeled bin symbol
  • any battery containing more than 0.002 per cent of cadmium by weight must be marked with the chemical symbol 'Cd' below the crossed out wheeled bin symbol
  • while there is no restriction on the use of lead in batteries, any battery containing more than 0.004 per cent of lead by weight must be marked with the chemical symbol 'Pb' below the crossed out wheeled bin symbol.

The chemical symbol is intended to show that one of the restricted materials is present in the battery, not the amount of that material. The regulations set out specific dimensions for the marking of batteries and packaging with the symbol.

Removability of waste batteries from appliances

If you place appliances on the market that contain batteries, or are designed to incorporate batteries, you must ensure that:

  • the appliance is designed so that a waste battery can be readily removed from it
  • instructions are included showing how the battery can be removed safely and, where appropriate, informing the end user of the type of battery incorporated.

This requirement does not apply where, for safety, performance, medical or data integrity reasons, continuity of power supply is necessary and a permanent connection is required between the appliance and the battery.

Further information

GOV.UK: Producer responsibilities – materials, labelling, design and enforcement

ROHS regulations

Capacity Labelling Regulation (EU)

What you must do

If you are a producer of industrial and/or automotive batteries you must register with the Department for Business, Innovation & Skills (BIS) using the National Packaging Waste Database (NPWD) within 28 days of the first day that you place batteries on the market. The NPWD is an integrated system that maintains a register of all types of battery producer - portable, industrial and automotive. You can find the NPWD on the Environment Agency website.

National Packaging Waste Database

Industrial battery take back

Producers of industrial batteries must offer and be ready to take back and collect waste industrial batteries from end users free of charge in the following instances:

  • On request, when the producer is supplying new industrial batteries to the end user during the calendar year of purchase.
  • On request, when the end user is not able to return waste industrial batteries to the original producer that supplied the batteries or outside the calendar year of purchase, eg when not purchasing new batteries from a producer. This only applies to producers that have placed industrial batteries on the market in the previous three years that are the same chemistry of waste batteries the end user is trying to dispose of. End users are expected to approach first the original supplier of the batteries which have now become waste, if they are registered as a producer.
  • If an end user is unable to dispose of waste industrial batteries by either of the options above - eg when an end user is not purchasing new batteries, and a chemistry has not been placed on the market for a number of years, so that an appropriate producer cannot be located - as a last resort the end user can contact any producer to request take back and collection free of charge.

You must publish details of how end users can contact you to arrange free take back and collection of their waste industrial batteries by 1 December of the year before you place batteries on the market. As a minimum for example, this information should be made available and easily accessible on your website.

Automotive battery take back

Producers of automotive batteries must offer to take back and collect waste automotive batteries from final holders free of charge. Final holders include garages, scrap yards, end-of-life vehicle authorised treatment facilities, civic amenity sites or anyone else that removes automotive batteries from vehicles as part of their daily business.

If you intend to place automotive batteries on the market, you must publish details of how final holders can contact you to arrange free collection of their waste automotive batteries by 1 December in the year before you place batteries on the market. As a minimum for example, this information should be made available and easily accessible on your website.

Sending waste batteries for recycling or export

All collected waste industrial and automotive batteries must be sent to an approved battery treatment operator (ABTO) for recycling, or to an approved battery exporter (ABE) that can export the waste batteries for recycling. Collection and transport may be carried out by appropriately authorised third parties.

For a list of ABTOs and ABEs, you can call:

  • the NIEA Batteries Helpline on Tel 028 9056 9382.
  • SEPA on Tel 01786 457 700.

Storing waste batteries

If you store waste industrial or automotive batteries at your site, you may need a waste management licence or registered exemption.

In Northern Ireland

You can register an exemption from waste management licensing if you store less than five tonnes of automotive or industrial batteries in any six month period. If you store more than five tonnes, you must have a waste management licence. The storage site must have a sealed drainage system and all storage must take place on an impermeable pavement, under weatherproof covering.

NIEA: Information on complex exemptions

In Scotland

You can register an exemption if you store less than five cubic metres of portable, industrial or automotive batteries in any 12 month period. If you store more than five cubic metres, you must have a waste management licence. If you store batteries, even for short periods, you must keep them on an impermeable surface with suitable weatherproof covering, or in suitable containers.

SEPA: Paragraph 17 Storage of specified wastes in a secure place

Record keeping and reporting

You must keep written records of the total amount of:

  • industrial and automotive batteries, in tonnes and by chemistry, that you have placed on the market for every year that you are registered as a producer
  • waste industrial and automotive batteries, in tonnes and by chemistry, that you have been requested to take back and collect, or arranged to have been collected, and sent for treatment and recycling.

For each year that you place industrial or automotive batteries on the UK market you must send an annual report to BIS, using the NPWD system. This must be sent by 31 March covering the preceding calendar year and include the information above.

Further information

National Packaging Waste Database

GOV.UK: Battery waste - producer and supplier responsibilities

Waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) Regulations

ROHS Regulations

Hazardous/special waste

What you must do

If you place portable batteries on the UK market, either included with electrical equipment or separately, you must join a battery compliance scheme (BCS) or register directly with either:

  • the Northern Ireland Environment Agency (NIEA)
  • the Scottish Environment protection Agency (SEPA).

Battery compliance schemes

If you place more than one tonne of portable batteries per year on the UK market, you must join one of several approved BCSs by 15 October in the year preceding the compliance year. If you do not know by 15 October if you will be placing batteries on the market in the forthcoming compliance year, you must join a compliance scheme within 28 days of when you start placing batteries on the market. BCS act on behalf of producers of portable batteries to meet their collection and recycling obligations. You should consider the services each BCS offers and the associated costs.

You must provide your BCS with the sales data it requires.

A BCS takes responsibility for:

  • registering producers on the National Packaging Waste Database (NPWD)
  • reporting sales data
  • publicity and collection
  • making sure waste portable batteries are treated and recycled
  • reporting recycling data

In Northern Ireland: BCS information on the Environment Agency website

In Scotland: SEPA: Batteries compliance schemes (BCS) information

 

Small producers of portable batteries

If you place one tonne or less of portable batteries per year on the UK market, you must register directly with your environmental regulator using the NPWD. The NPWD is an integrated system that maintains a register of all types of battery producer - portable, industrial and automotive.

You must register using the NPWD within 28 days of the date when you first place portable batteries on the market. You must provide information about your business and the tonnage and chemistry type of batteries you place on the market.

NIEA: Information on battery producer responsibilities

SEPA: Information on battery producer responsibilities

Environment Agency: National Packaging Waste Database (NPWD) information

Record keeping

All producers must keep written records of the total amount of batteries in tonnes that they place on the market in the UK per year, every year.

Further information

GOV.UK: Battery waste - producer and supplier responsibilities

Contact your environmental regulator

If you supply 32 kilograms or more of portable batteries per year to end users, you must allow all end users to return waste portable batteries free of charge. If you have more than one retail outlet, you only have to take back batteries at those that supply more than the 32 kilogram threshold. The responsibilities apply even if you are using distance selling methods.

One pack of four AA batteries per day is approximately 32 kilograms per year.

You must:

  • ensure there is a free collection point for all kinds of waste portable batteries, not only the types you supply
  • provide information to end users about your take-back arrangements

Only batteries supplied separately from equipment count towards the 32 kilograms threshold. Distributors of equipment containing portable batteries - such as laptop computers or mobile phones - do not have to take back waste portable batteries unless they also supply portable batteries separately.

You must not charge end users for returning waste portable batteries. They can drop off waste portable batteries without having to buy new batteries. You must not show customers the separate cost of collecting, treating and recycling batteries.

If you have a collection point for customers waste batteries, you do not need a waste management licence to store them on site. When they are moved, or collected by a registered waste carrier, you must treat them as Hazardous/special waste. (Alkaline batteries are not considered as hazardous/special waste, however a mixed load will probably contain batteries containing lithium, cadmium or mercury. You will need to pre notify SEPA/NIEA and use a consignment note.

Hazardous/special waste

Point-of-sale information

You must provide information to customers about your take-back facility, including the location of your take-back facility and how it can be used. To help you with this you can download posters and identifiers.

If you supply portable batteries online or by mail order, you could include the identifier on your website or on other relevant documentation. You will still need to provide the information about your take-back service, however.

Store waste batteries securely

You should collect waste batteries in secure containers.

If you store waste portable batteries at a collection point, this activity is automatically exempt from waste management licensing, so you will not need to register an exemption.

If you intend to transport the waste batteries you collect yourself, you must comply with controls on special waste and dangerous goods.

GOV.UK: Battery waste - producer and supplier responsibilities

You must also ensure that the batteries collected are taken for recycling. Distributors with obligations to have a take-back system are entitled to request a free collection from battery compliance schemes (BCSs).

BCS duties

You should contact a BCS to arrange for the waste batteries that you have collected to be taken away. The BCS must respond within 21 days in order to make arrangements for collection. The collection must be free of charge to the distributor.

For more information on BCSs you can call:

  • NIEA Batteries helpline Tel 028 9056 9382
  • SEPA on Tel 01786 457 700.

Distributors below the 32 kilogram threshold

If you supply less than 32 kilograms of portable batteries in a year, you have no waste portable battery take-back responsibilities. You can still choose to collect waste batteries, but you will not be entitled to free collection by a BCS. You may need to arrange for the transport and disposal of the waste portable batteries that you have collected yourself. You must therefore comply with controls on special waste and dangerous goods.

It is recommended that you contact a BCS or your waste contractor before you start collecting waste portable batteries to find out what recycling options they operate that you may be able to access.

There are several different ways that you can recycle your batteries at the end of their life, depending on the type. For information on the different types, see the page in this guide on Identifying different battery types.

Recycling waste portable batteries

If your business uses portable batteries, your supplier will operate a take-back scheme unless they supply less than 32 kilograms of batteries per year. You should check with your supplier to find out their arrangements for the collection of waste portable batteries and whether they are convenient for you. You could also contact your current waste contractor to discuss what options they offer.

Waste management contractors and local authorities may also have collections available in your area.

Find your local council

Find your nearest waste site

Mixed waste batteries and certain types of batteries are classed as hazardous/special waste. You must only transport your waste batteries to sites that have the appropriate waste management licence or exemption from the NIEA or SEPA.

Hazardous/special waste

Recycling waste industrial batteries

If you buy new industrial batteries, the battery producer must, if requested, take back and collect your waste industrial batteries free of charge within the calendar year of purchase. Contact the supplier of your industrial battery to find out what arrangements they have in place.

If you are discarding your waste industrial batteries after the calendar year of purchase and not replacing them with new ones, you can approach the original supplier to request free take back and collection as long as they are still registered as a producer and placing that chemistry of industrial battery on the market (or have done so in the previous three years). Alternatively, you can approach other producers of industrial batteries for take back and collection free of charge as long as they are placing the same chemistry of battery on the market or have done so in the previous three years.

As a last resort, if you are unable to dispose of waste industrial batteries by either of the options above, you can contact any producer of industrial batteries to request take back and collection free of charge.

You can search for registered battery producers on the National Packaging Waste Database.

National Packaging Waste Database

Recycling waste automotive batteries

You are likely to be a 'final holder' of waste automotive batteries if you run a:

  • garage
  • scrap yard
  • end-of-life vehicle authorised treatment facility
  • local council civic amenity site

You can request free collection of waste automotive batteries from any producer who currently supplies new automotive batteries. For a list of registered producers:

  • in Northern Ireland you can call the NIEA Batteries Helpline on Tel 028 9056 9382
  • in Scotland you can call SEPA on Tel 01786 457700.

You may find that the value of lead in waste automotive batteries means that independent battery collectors may approach you to purchase and take away your waste batteries due to their value. However, you are likely to need a number of waste batteries to make it worth their while. You must make sure your waste automotive batteries are stored, handled, recycled or disposed of safely and legally by licensed individuals or businesses.

Duty of care - your waste responsibilities.

If you treat or recycle waste batteries you must have a permit or licence. You may also need approval to be an approved battery treatment operator (ABTO).

What you must do

Applying for a permit or licence

If you treat or recycle waste batteries you must have a waste management licence or registered exemption from your environmental regulator.

You must comply with the conditions in your licence or you can be fined or sent to prison.

If you treat waste batteries and your licence was issued before:

  • 20 May 2009 in Northern Ireland
  • 6 July 2009 in Scotland

you must comply with the following conditions:

  • remove all fluids and acids from the batteries
  • store waste batteries, and the materials that result from treatment, in secure, covered and impermeable areas.

These conditions have been added to your licence by law.

If your licence was issued after that date, you must comply with the conditions in your licence.

Apply to be an ABTO

You must apply to the NIEA in Northern Ireland, or SEPA in Scotland, if you want to be an ABTO in order to:

  • carry out the initial treatment or recycling of automotive or industrial batteries
  • issue batteries evidence notes for the treatment and recycling of waste portable batteries.

If you are an ABTO you must make sure that you:

  • use the best available technology to treat or recycle batteries
  • comply with all relevant health and safety, and waste management regulations
  • remove all fluids and acids from the batteries
  • store waste batteries, and the materials that result from treatment, in secure, covered and impermeable areas.

You must achieve minimum recycling levels of:

  • 65 per cent of the average weight of all lead acid batteries
  • 75 per cent of the average weight of all nickel cadmium batteries
  • 50 per cent of the average weight of other waste batteries.

Keep records of battery treatment

You must keep records of the amount in tonnes of batteries you accept for treatment or recycling. You must provide the NIEA or SEPA with details of the quantity of batteries you have dealt with and the amount you received from each battery compliance scheme.

You must provide batteries evidence notes to battery compliance scheme operators to confirm the number of tonnes of batteries you have accepted for treatment in a year. You must supply battery evidence notes before 30 April in the year following each compliance period.

If you export waste batteries you may need approval to be an approved battery exporter (ABE).

What you must do

Apply to be an ABE

You must apply to either:

  • the Northern Ireland Environment Agency (NIEA)
  • the Scottish Environment Protection Agency (SEPA).

if you want to be and ABE, in order to:

  • export waste industrial or automotive batteries for treatment or recycling
  • issue batteries evidence notes for exporting waste portable batteries for treatment and recycling.

If you are an ABE, you must ensure that the overseas business that accepts the batteries for treatment:

  • uses the best available technology to treat or recycle batteries
  • complies with all relevant health and safety, and waste management regulations
  • removes all fluids and acids from the batteries
  • stores waste batteries, and the materials that result from treatment, in secure, covered and impermeable areas.

You must ensure that the overseas business that treats or recycles the waste batteries achieves minimum recycling levels of:

  • 65 per cent of the average weight of all lead acid batteries
  • 75 per cent of the average weight of all nickel cadmium batteries
  • 50 per cent of the average weight of other waste batteries.

These conditions apply to businesses that operate in the European Economic Area (EEA) and those based outside the EEA.

Keep records of your battery exports

You must keep records of the total amount in tonnes of batteries that you have exported for treatment or recycling. You must provide the NIEA or SEPA with details of the quantity of batteries you have exported and the amount you received from each battery compliance scheme.

If you plan to partially treat batteries before exporting them you must register as an approved battery treatment operator. You will have to keep records of the total amount of batteries in tonnes that you treat. See the page in this guideline on Treating or recycling waste batteries.

You must provide battery evidence notes to the operators of battery compliance schemes to confirm the number of tonnes of batteries you have exported in a year. You must supply battery evidence notes before 30 April in the following year.

If you want to operate as a battery compliance scheme (BCS) you must apply between 15 April and 15 May in the year before you wish to operate.

Your application must be in writing, signed and include:

  • full details of the applicant
  • payment of the scheme application charge.

All applications are subject to approval by either:

  • the Northern Ireland Environment Agency (NIEA)
  • the Scottish Environment Protection Agency (SEPA)

What you must do

Duties of a BCS

You must:

  • maintain data records of all scheme members
  • make sure that all members have registered with the NIEA or SEPA cover the costs of collection, treatment and recycling of all batteries that the scheme members are responsible for, and batteries collected in excess of these requirements
  • cover the costs of an information campaign to let customers know what they should do with their waste batteries
  • keep records of all batteries produced by scheme members
  • keep records of all batteries the scheme has collected.

You must submit a declaration of compliance to the NIEA for each compliance period no later than 31 May in the following year.

Northern Ireland: Information on becoming a BCS operator on the Environment Agency website

Scotland: SEPA: Information for BCS operators

This page provides links to the full text of key pieces of environmental legislation relating to batteries. The websites hosting the legislation may list amendments separately.

If you are setting up an environmental management system (EMS) for your business, you can use this list to start compiling your legal register. Your legal adviser or environmental consultant will be able to tell you if other environmental legislation applies to your specific business.

Environmental management systems and environmental reports

Northern Ireland

Batteries and Accumulators (Placing on the Market) Regulations SI 2008/2164. Sets out requirements for the placing of new batteries and accumulators on the European Union market including substance restrictions, labelling of new batteries and design of appliances so that waste batteries can be readily removed.

Waste Batteries and Accumulators Regulations SI 2009/890. Establishes a framework for the separate collection, treatment and recycling of waste industrial, automotive and portable batteries. Applies to all types of batteries, subject to exemption.

Waste Batteries and Accumulators (Charges) Regulations (Northern Ireland) SR 2009/157. Set charges to be paid to the Department of the Environment by small producers, battery compliance schemes, battery treatment operators and battery exporters under the Batteries and Accumulators Regulations 2009.

Waste Batteries and Accumulators (Treatment and Disposal) Regulations (Northern Ireland) SR 2009/159. Sets out exemptions from waste management licensing for storing waste batteries. Amends the Landfill Regulations (Northern Ireland) 2003 and the Pollution Prevention and Control (Regulations) (Northern Ireland) 2003 to ban automotive and industrial batteries from landfill or incineration.

Batteries and Accumulators (Placing on the Market) (Amendment) Regulations SI 2012/1139 Amend 2008/2164 by inserting a new regulation to give effect to the requirement for capacity labelling and the enforcement of this.

The Batteries and Accumulators (Placing on the Market) (Amendment) Regulations 2015

Amends the 2008 regulations by removing the exemption for button cells containing up to 2% Mercury, by removing the exemption for power tool batteries containing cadmium, and makes changes to the wording surrounding the removal of batteries from equipment.

The Waste Batteries and Accumulators (Amendment) Regulations 2015

Make amendments to the 2009 regulations; the removal of the requirement to provide operational plans, removal of the requirement to submit independent audit reports, and allows an “approved person” to delegate the responsibility for signing off reports.

Scotland

Batteries and Accumulators (Placing on the Market) Regulations SI 2008/2164. Sets out requirements for the placing of new batteries and accumulators on the European Union market including substance restrictions, labelling of new batteries and design of appliances so that waste batteries can be readily removed.

Waste Batteries and Accumulators Regulations SI 2009/890. Establishes a framework for the separate collection, treatment and recycling of waste industrial, automotive and portable batteries. Applies to all types of batteries, subject to exemption.

Waste Batteries (Scotland) Regulations SSI 2009/247. Establishes a legal framework and schemes for collecting, treating and recycling portable, industrial and vehicle batteries. Applies to all types of batteries except when used for military and space equipment.

Batteries and Accumulators (Placing on the Market) (Amendment) Regulations SI 2012/1139 Amend 2008/2164 by inserting a new regulation to give effect to the requirement for capacity labelling and the enforcement of this.

The Batteries and Accumulators (Placing on the Market) (Amendment) Regulations 2015

Amends the 2008 regulations by removing the exemption for button cells containing up to 2% Mercury, by removing the exemption for power tool batteries containing cadmium, and makes changes to the wording surrounding the removal of batteries from equipment.

The Waste Batteries and Accumulators (Amendment) Regulations 2015

Make minor amendments to the 2009 regulations; the removal of the requirement to provide operational plans, removal of the requirement to submit independent audit reports, and allows an “approved person” to delegate the responsibility for signing off reports.

Further Information

NetRegs: Environmental legislation for Northern Ireland and Scotland

Hazardous/special waste

Whats new on NetRegs

  • SEPA unveils new waste to resources framework

    A new framework for tackling waste has been unveiled by the Scottish Environment Protection Agency (SEPA), focussing on how SEPA will support a circular economy in Scotland.
    One Planet Prosperity – A Waste to Resources Framework

  • Waste – Duty of Care Roles and Responsibilities

    The Northern Ireland Environment Agency has published a short guide to the duty of care responsibilities including advice and information for waste producers, carriers and those accepting, storing and treating waste.

    https://www.daera-ni.gov.uk/publications/waste-duty-care-responsibilities

  • Please let us know your thoughts on our new website

    What do you think about our new and improved website. We want your feedback on what you like, what you don’t like and ways we can continue to improve the website. Follow the link to complete the very short survey: NetRegs website – User feedback

  • NEW guidance on Environmental Management Systems

    We have recently updated and improved our guidance on Environmental Management Systems (EMS). You can find the guidance via the Environmental Topics tab or alternatively select the following link Environmental Management Systems (EMS).

  • Consultation on proposed changes to the packaging recycling business targets

    See NI Future legislation or Scotland Future legislation for details of the Consultation

  • NetRegs SMEnvironment survey 2016

    NetRegs has carried out a survey of environmental awareness among SMEs. There are separate reports for Scotland and Northern Ireland.

  • NIEA Guidance - Greenfield Excavated Matrials in Construction

    NIEA and the CEF have developed a Regulatory Position to promote Sustainable re-use of natural excavated material from Greenfield sites.

    NIEA: Guidance on the Regulation of Greenfield Excavated Materials in Construction and Development

  • New GPP 2 Above Ground Oil Storage

    The replacements for the PPGs are being developed. Now available GPP 2 Above Ground Oil Storage

  • SEPA Consultation on an Intergated Authorisation Framework

    SEPA is asking for your views on the proposals for integrated authorisations.

    Consultation documents

  • GPP 24 Stables, Kennels and Catteries

    NEW GPP 24 now available: Stables, Kennels and Catteries

  • ENDS Award Shortlist

    NetRegs has been nominated for 3 ENDS Awards with the result being revealed on the 4th of May.

  • NetRegs wins an ENDS Environmental Impact Award

    Knowledge development category winners, see the END Awards

  • EIA (Agriculture) Regulations for Northern Ireland

    Any person intending to alter the use or management of areas of uncultivated or semi-natural land must obtain prior approval from the Department of Agriculture, Environment and Rural Affairs (DAERA).

    Read more on the DAERA website

NetRegs on NetRegs on youTube

View our latest videos & subscribe to our channel.

NetRegs Update Newsletter

Free monthly email newsletter with environmental updates for Northern Ireland and Scotland

Sign up for free today!

Permits

NIEA - Apply online

SEPA - Application forms